« | Home | Recent Comments | Categories | »

LRO First Light images of the Moon!

Posted on July 2nd, 2009 at 20:22 by John Sinteur in category: Great Picture

[Quote:]

The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter has returned its first images from the Moon! Woohoo!

Check. It. Out!

365431main_nacl000000fd_top_detail
This image, taken in the Mare Nubium region of the Moon, shows a heavily cratered area. The scale here is amazing: the whole image is 1400 meters across, or just under a mile. That’s like looking out your airplane window… if you were over the frakking Moon!

[..]

the LRO camera has a page where you can see the raw images, and zoom in — WAY in — on the image strips. They have 73 cm resolution, folks. Yikes.


Write a comment

Microsoft distances self from IE 8 puke ads

Posted on July 2nd, 2009 at 18:56 by John Sinteur in category: If you're in marketing, kill yourself, Microsoft

[Quote:]

Apparently, puking about porn was too much for Microsoft’s delicate sensibilities on Internet Explorer 8.

Microsoft has distanced itself from an ad fronted by TV’s ex-Superman Dean Cain that featured a woman vomiting over her partner after she discovered the porn stash hidden in his browser history.

The ad has been pulled form Microsoft’s official Better Browser web site and its IE 8 channel on YouTube. You can still catch the ad on the rest of YouTube here or below.


Write a comment

Comments:

  1. That is hilarious…and so friggin’…sad…bunch o’ losers…isn’t there anyone actually at the helm anymore?

Saddam Hussein Said WMD Talk Helped Him Look Strong to Iran

Posted on July 2nd, 2009 at 17:14 by John Sinteur in category: Mess O'Potamia

[Quote:]

Saddam Hussein told an FBI interviewer before he was hanged that he allowed the world to believe he had weapons of mass destruction because he was worried about appearing weak to Iran, according to declassified accounts of the interviews released yesterday. The former Iraqi president also denounced Osama bin Laden as “a zealot” and said he had no dealings with al-Qaeda.

Hussein, in fact, said he felt so vulnerable to the perceived threat from “fanatic” leaders in Tehran that he would have been prepared to seek a “security agreement with the United States to protect [Iraq] from threats in the region.”

[..]

At one point, Hussein dismissed as a fantasy the many intelligence reports that said he used a body double to elude assassination. “This is movie magic, not reality,” he said with a laugh. Instead, he said, he had used a phone only twice since 1990 and rarely slept in the same location two days in a row.

Hussein’s fear of Iran, which he said he considered a greater threat than the United States, featured prominently in the discussion about weapons of mass destruction. Iran and Iraq had fought a grinding eight-year war in the 1980s, and Hussein said he was convinced that Iran was trying to annex southern Iraq — which is largely Shiite. “Hussein viewed the other countries in the Middle East as weak and could not defend themselves or Iraq from an attack from Iran,” Piro recounted in his summary of a June 11, 2004, conversation.

“The threat from Iran was the major factor as to why he did not allow the return of UN inspectors,” Piro wrote. “Hussein stated he was more concerned about Iran discovering Iraq’s weaknesses and vulnerabilities than the repercussions of the United States for his refusal to allow UN inspectors back into Iraq.”


Write a comment

Cartoons

Posted on July 2nd, 2009 at 16:57 by John Sinteur in category: Cartoon


Write a comment

A Look at the Venezuelan Healthcare System

Posted on July 2nd, 2009 at 14:30 by John Sinteur in category: News

[Quote:]

During my time in Venezuela, I developed a cough that went on for three weeks and progressively worsened. Finally, after I had become incredibly congested and developed a fever, I decided to attend a Barrio Adentro clinic. The closest one available was a Barrio Adentro II Centro de Diagonostico Integral (CDI) and I headed in without my medical records or calling to make an appointment. Immediately, I was ushered into a small room where Carmen, a friendly Cuban doctor, began questioning me about my symptoms. She listened to my lungs and walked me over to another examination room where, again without waiting, I had x-rays taken. Afterwards, the technician walked me to a chair and apologized profusely that I had to wait for the x-rays to be developed, promising that it would take no more than five minutes. Sure enough, five minutes later he returned with both x-rays developed. Carmen studied the x-rays and informed me that I had pneumonia, showing me the telltale shadows. She sent me away with my x-rays, three medications to treat my pneumonia, congestion, and fever, and made me promise to come back if my conditioned failed to improve or worsened within three days.

I walked out of the clinic with a diagnosis and treatment within twenty-five minutes of entering, without paying a dime. There was no wait, no paperwork, and no questions about my ability to pay, my nationality, or whether, as a foreigner, I was entitled to free comprehensive health care. There was no monetary value connected with my physical well-being; the care I received was not contingent upon my ability to pay. I was treated with dignity, respect, and compassion, my illness was cured and I was able to continue with my journey in Venezuela.


Write a comment

Comments:

  1. So, obviously, this doctor was paid by someone — the government, and in turn, the residents through taxation. I know nothing about the scale or distribution of taxation in Venezuela, but I think they see the obvious: health care is like roads and schools: something that should be available, period. I’m still waiting for one good explanation of how we’ll be worse off with universal, single-payer health care. I don’t fear ‘the government coming between me and my doctor’ — right now I’ve got an insurance company, and nothing — (sometimes I think even no insurance) — could be worse. I have right here on my desk a 2.5″ thick stack of papers from the insurance companies and doctors. This is for 5 doctor office visits: 2 annual checkups for my kids, one common illness (URI) for my husband, one for me (again, URI), and a routine colonoscopy for my husband. I’ve paid out of pocket for 3 of the five, because the insurance companies have their heads so far … well, you get the idea. No, give me a government employee any day — there is a decent chance they’ll be motivated by doing the right thing, not at how much, how hard, and how often they can screw you to the benefit of their bottom line.

The Science news cycle

Posted on July 2nd, 2009 at 14:10 by John Sinteur in category: Cartoon

[Quote:]

phd051809s


Write a comment

Comments:

  1. Although it’s probably a piece of The Internets, this cycle ignores all of the religious fundamentalists who start preaching about the end of the world and how this is the time to repent……..

    (Note: the one exception to that, of course, is scientific proof of global warming…)

The indoors windmill

Posted on July 2nd, 2009 at 14:03 by John Sinteur in category: Great Picture

[Quote:]

indoor-windmill


Write a comment

Conspiracy To Hide Bubble-Formation

Posted on July 2nd, 2009 at 13:37 by John Sinteur in category: Robber Barons

[Quote:]

In yet another move to make a mockery of so-called market transparency, and again with mad props to Zerohedge, we have this:

The Exchange has filed with the SEC to implement the decommissioning of the DPTRrequirement following the July 10, 2009 trade date. Accordingly, the last required submission of the DPTR will be on July 14, 2009, which is the second business day after the last trade date for which the DPTR is required.

Go read the entire Zerohedge article; what this means, in short, is that the ability of people (like you and I) to see the fact that a handful of banks, most specifically Goldman Sachs, constitute the majority of NYSE trading volume – and they’re trading for their own book, not for customers, will no longer be disclosed.

This “back and forth trade” between a handful of institutions is nothing more than the old “pump and dump” game that has been played in the OTC market forever – and almost always screws the individual investor.


Write a comment

Parents in faith-healing case never considered calling a doctor

Posted on July 2nd, 2009 at 13:33 by John Sinteur in category: Pastafarian News

[Quote:]

Carl and Raylene Worthington told detectives that they never considered calling a doctor, even as their 15-month-old daughter deteriorated and died.

“I don’t believe in them,” Carl Worthington said of doctors. “I believe in faith healing.”

Raylene Worthington said that her religious beliefs do not encompass medical care and that she would not have done anything different for her – daughter, who died at home of pneumonia, a blood infection and other complications.

In Clackamas County Circuit Court on Wednesday, prosecutors played videotaped police interviews with the Worthingtons, who are accused of criminal mistreatment and manslaughter for failing to provide medical care for their daughter. Ava Worthington died March 2, 2008, after her parents and other members of the Followers of Christ tried to treat her with faith healing.

Oddly enough, they do believe in lawyers, as they’ve got one defending them. What makes these people reject one type of professionals and not another? Why get a lawyer when he could have just prayed for an acquittal?


Write a comment

Comments:

  1. THAT WOULD BE AWESOME. There should totally be a “faith lawyer” movement. It worked for Charles Guiteau! “Worked”. He was still hanged. But whatever! There should be a Mary Baker Eddy of defending in courts through faith.

Teen plane crash survivor ‘didn’t feel a thing’

Posted on July 2nd, 2009 at 10:32 by John Sinteur in category: Pastafarian News

[Quote:]

“She is a very, very shy girl. I would never have thought she would have survived like this. I can’t say that it’s a miracle, I can say that it is God’s will,” he said.

Just like killing the 152 other passengers, right?

Oh, and why is it that shy people are somehow less likely to survive a crash?


Write a comment

Comments:

  1. He could not say: She is a strong girl.
    After all, he was talking about a girl, so she can’t be strong.
    Plus: it was God’s will. God only save the innocent and those who behave the way they should. Girls must be shy, restrained, and pure.
    Simple, no? :)

ISS020 Sarychev Peak Eruption

Posted on July 2nd, 2009 at 10:23 by John Sinteur in category: Great Picture

[Quote:]

Animation of the Sarychev Peak volcano eruption, created from 29 still frames taken by astronauts aboard the ISS.


Write a comment

“BOOM!” (More Obfuscation)

Posted on July 2nd, 2009 at 10:09 by John Sinteur in category: Robber Barons

[Quote:]

“Someone” paid 7% for overnight money on the Fed Trading system last night (that “someone” was a bank, by the way.)

This will be claimed to be “ordinary” end of quarter distortions for closing the books.

Don’t believe it for a second.

Let’s put this in plain language: The discount window is open for any bank that has good collateral at less than 1/10th of that interest rate. 

Therefore there is absolutely no reason for any institution to go into the Fed Funds market for overnight money at 7% unless they have no good collateral to post against it and thus cannot go to the window.

So who is it?  No idea.  And while the amount borrowed overnight at that rate may be tiny, that’s not the point – the point is that the last time we saw anything that dramatic was just before it all went “boom” last year.


Write a comment

Behind the Mask – Michael Jackson’s rarest recording?

Posted on July 2nd, 2009 at 5:54 by John Sinteur in category: News

[Quote:]

Michael Jackson penned and recorded lots of songs, many of which remain unreleased. Perhaps the most infamous, and rarest recording, is his version of Behind the Mask. Legend has it that upon hearing Yellow Magic Orchestra’s original track, somewhen around 1979, Quincy Jones fell in love with the track, and he and Michael worked together on their own version. Jackson wrote new lyrics for it – adding to those of Ryuichi Sakamoto and Chris Mosdell – and eventually recorded it during his Off The Wall sessions. For unknown reasons the track never made the final cut of, arguably, Jones’ and Jackson’s greatest work. Not long afterwards Greg Phillinganes, Jackson’s keyboard player, released his own version of the song, which was later taken up and re-recorded by Eric Clapton for his 1986, Phil Collins produced album, August. The track has since been recorded/remixed by Human League, Senor Coconut, Orbital and others. Does an original Jones/Jackson recording of the song even exist? Perhaps, as the world continues to mourn the star’s sad death, someone will finally allow us a listen.


Write a comment