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Tea Party Protests: ‘Nigger,’ ‘Faggot’ Shouted At Members Of Congress

Posted on March 21st, 2010 at 22:12 by John Sinteur in category: News

[Quote:]

Preceding the president’s speech to a gathering of House Democrats, thousands of protesters descended around the Capitol to protest the passage of health care reform. The gathering quickly turned into abusive heckling, as members of Congress passing through Longworth House office building were subjected to epithets and even mild physical abuse.

A staffer for Rep. James Clyburn (D-S.C.) told reporters that Rep. Emanuel Cleaver (D-Mo.) had been spat on by a protestor. Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.), a hero of the civil rights movement, was called a ‘nigger.’ And Rep. Barney Frank (D-Mass.) was called a “faggot,” as protestors shouted at him with deliberately lisp-y screams. Frank, approached in the halls after the president’s speech, shrugged off the incident.

Finally they are showing their colors. The only thing one could have against health care reform is that it may prolong the lives of those who oppose it. Before today I would say this is clear enough for them to understand, but they won’t hear it as long as their racist mind is clouding things.

On the other hand, we could thank that miserable stain of human excrement Rupert Murdoch for this whole thing


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  1. True colors indeed and the face (or should I say ass) of Beck, Limbaugh, et. al.

Cartoons

Posted on March 21st, 2010 at 20:26 by John Sinteur in category: Cartoon


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Comments:

  1. Wow! That’s the first time I’ve ever seen a FoxTrot cartoon that was, you know, funny.

Non-believing clergy: Now what shall we do?

Posted on March 21st, 2010 at 13:01 by John Sinteur in category: Pastafarian News

[Quote:]

Read “Preachers who are not Believers,” a study by Daniel C. Dennett and Linda LaScola of the Center for Cognitive Studies at Tufts University.

[..]

Here are some questions that have haunted me for years. How many preachers actually believe what they say from the pulpit? We know that every year some clergy abandon their calling, no longer able to execute their duties with conviction. This can never be a decision taken lightly, and many of them labored on for years before taking the leap. Are they the tip of an iceberg? Is there a problem of deep hypocrisy separating many pastors from their flocks? What is it like to be a non-believing preacher? How do they reconcile their private skepticism with the obligations of their position? And how did they get into their predicament?

[..]

Our report tells the different–and moving–stories of five good people who find themselves caught in a trap that only someone intent on doing good could fall into, a trap that nobody invented but that subtly and ingeniously blocks the exits. Of course we don’t know how many variations on these stories are yet untold. We hope our presentation of these pioneers will encourage others to tell us their stories, so that the world can know something more about this phenomenon, which can only grow in importance as more and more religious leaders confront the flood of ideas and information that we in the developed world are swimming in today.


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