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When He Was A Young Man In Alabama, Tim Cook Stumbled Upon A KKK Cross Burning

Posted on June 15th, 2014 at 22:20 by John Sinteur in category: Apple -- Write a comment

[Quote]:

This NYT profile of Tim Cook opens with a harrowing anecdote from the Apple CEO’s early life in 1970s Alabama:

Bicycling home on a new 10-speed, [Cook] passed a large cross in flames in front of a house — one that he knew belonged to a black family. Around the cross were Klansmen, dressed in white cloaks and hoods, chanting racial slurs. Mr. Cook heard glass break, maybe someone throwing something through a window. He yelled, “Stop!”

One of the men lifted his conical hood, and Mr. Cook recognized a deacon from a local church (not Mr. Cook’s). Startled, he pedaled away.

Reflecting on this event in December during his acceptance speech for Auburn University’s International Quality of Life Award, he said, “This image was permanently imprinted in my brain, and it would change my life forever” — human rights and dignity are “values that need to be acted upon,” and Apple is a company that believes in “advancing humanity.”

Of course. Remember this?

I wonder if that deacon is still alive. I want him to see how vastly that one act of hatred has backfired…

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