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Amazon Gets Increasingly Nervous

Posted on August 11th, 2014 at 10:52 by John Sinteur in category: Amazon -- Write a comment

[Quote]:

In sum and once again: Amazon is not your friend. Neither is any other corporation. It and they do what they do for their own interest and are more than willing to try to make you try believe that what they do for their own benefit is in fact for yours. It’s not. In this particular case, this is not about readers or authors or anyone else but Amazon wanting eBooks capped at $9.99 for its own purposes. It should stop pretending that this is about anything other than that. Readers, authors, and everyone else should stop pretending it’s about anything other than that, too.

  1. I can’t wait for the movie. That deep booming promo voice:

    “In a world where dark forces are constantly trying to enslave us all; one man, leading a tiny band of heroes, is struggling against all odds to overcome a many-headed monster of the deep…”

    Apple did that one price per track thing. Is this different?

  2. Well, yes and no. I agree with Gruber on this: I think Apple cares about music in a way that Amazon does not care about books. Maybe only because Steve Jobs personally cared about music in a serious way, but now it’s ingrained in Apple’s culture.

    (And if we want to be cynical, let’s admit that it’s possible for Apple to care about music for music’s sake because they sell tens of millions of expensive gadgets on which we listen to music every quarter.)

  3. Speaking as someone who self-publishes ebooks (and who sets his own prices), I would like to point out that it was Apple that forced Amazon to pay higher royalties on ebook sales. Apple drove the royalties up from 35% to 70% and Amazon has already had to scramble to remain competitive. There are other, smaller sites like Smashwords or Lulu that pay even higher royalties.

  4. Fits on the cynical bit – Apple makes more money from the devices they sell with the iBooks app on it than from e-book sales, so it is in their interest to make the authors pick them over Amazon. They probably ran the numbers on the best (for them) royalty percentage to give to authors, and 70% for the authors makes them the most money.

  5. @Mudak: What does Apple pay 70% royalties on? And to whom, publishers or authors?

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