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Average full-time workweek is 47 hours, Gallup says

Posted on August 30th, 2014 at 0:51 by John Sinteur in category: News -- Write a comment

[Quote]:

Full-time American workers labor the equivalent of nearly an additional day each week, averaging 47 hours instead of the standard 40, according to Gallup poll results released Friday.

Just 42% of full-time employees work 40 hours a week, the traditional total based on five 9 a.m.-to-5 p.m. workdays, Gallup said of findings it released ahead of the Labor Day weekend.

Nearly the same percentage — 39% — say they work at least 50 hours a week. And almost one in five Americans, or 18%, said their workweek stretched 60 hours or more.

“The 40-hour workweek is widely regarded as the standard for full-time employment, and many federal employment laws — including the Affordable Care Act, or ‘Obamacare’ — use this threshold to define what a full-time employee is,” Gallup said.

“However, barely four in 10 full-time workers in the U.S. indicate they work precisely this much,” Gallup said.

Salaried employees work an average of 49 hours a week, compared with 44 hours for people paid by the hour. A quarter of salaried workers said they spend 60 or more hours a week on the job.

116 million full-time employees times 7 hours per week over the 40-hour normal = 20,300,000 40-hour jobs. So, the 116-million full-time employees in America are now doing the work of 136 million people. There are 10.5 million people unemployed.

Do the math.

  1. There are of course several practical issues with your implied proposal.

    Say John, do you ever work more than 40 hours a week? I suspect it’s not unheard of. How come you’re not hiring me to do the extra work?

  2. Yes, that’s part of the problem indeed. A big part, I’d say. And Dutch labor protection laws are not really helping out there. I would have to take on so many responsibilities it might bankrupt me if you had an accident that would stop you from working for, say, six months. The complexity of hiring somebody are somewhat eased if I would use a pay-rolling intermediate, but if anybody would tell me it’s easy to hire help I would laugh so hard it would hurt. I’d love to be a “job creator”, but I’d be crazy to do so without a lot of other things to protect me. As a result, I’d rather stay a single-person company.

  3. Work hard, retire early then give your job to a person who needs it.

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