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NeXT vs Sun

Posted on July 21st, 2014 at 17:17 by John Sinteur in category: Apple

[Quote]:

In 1991 Steve Jobs’ company commissioned an head-to-head programming competition to show how much faster and easier it was to program a NeXT computer vs a Sun workstation. The NeXT operating system went on to be the foundation for Apple’s Macintosh OS-X about a decade later.


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Comments:

  1. Well, would I rather have learned to use NeXTstep or Devguide? Not sure. For the type of programs shown here, relative simple GUI plus simple key-value storage, sure, but for writing all the other stuff, not sure. But what I don’t get is that the Sun guy can’t display Postscript on a NeWS system using Devguide? That looks fishy. Personally, I would have used neither NeXTstep nor Devguide and saved a lot of money off the bat. My code would have been somewhat portable. ;-P I wonder what would happen nowadays if a free/open source buff would take on this challenge, as a web-app, against a seasoned Visual Studio coder.

  2. Why a web-app? How about a three-way battle between the Microsoft platform (Visual Studio and all the technologies that go along with it), XCode and all the Apple technologies, and Google?

    And have the requirements be something modern as well – with a social/mobile part (perhaps location based, sales people in the field exchanging some information, with push notifications and all that), scalable to millions of users, with user interfaces for at least three device families (phone/tablet/PC)?

    Then web technologies would be just a small part of the task. We’ve come a long way since 1991, let the challenge reflect that.

Skybox Can Predict iPhone Launch Using Satellite Imagery

Posted on June 17th, 2014 at 8:49 by John Sinteur in category: Apple, Google

[Quote]:

By the time its entire fleet of 24 satellites has launched in 2018, Skybox will be imaging the entire Earth at a resolution sufficient to capture, for example, real-time video of cars driving down the highway. And it will be doing it three times a day.

The ability to take such frequent imaging will certainly aid Google’s Maps product, but it also opens up a market for competitive intelligence. Skybox says they are already looking at Foxconn every week and are able to pinpoint the next iPhone release based on the density of trucks outside their manufacturing facilities.


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When He Was A Young Man In Alabama, Tim Cook Stumbled Upon A KKK Cross Burning

Posted on June 15th, 2014 at 22:20 by John Sinteur in category: Apple

[Quote]:

This NYT profile of Tim Cook opens with a harrowing anecdote from the Apple CEO’s early life in 1970s Alabama:

Bicycling home on a new 10-speed, [Cook] passed a large cross in flames in front of a house — one that he knew belonged to a black family. Around the cross were Klansmen, dressed in white cloaks and hoods, chanting racial slurs. Mr. Cook heard glass break, maybe someone throwing something through a window. He yelled, “Stop!”

One of the men lifted his conical hood, and Mr. Cook recognized a deacon from a local church (not Mr. Cook’s). Startled, he pedaled away.

Reflecting on this event in December during his acceptance speech for Auburn University’s International Quality of Life Award, he said, “This image was permanently imprinted in my brain, and it would change my life forever” — human rights and dignity are “values that need to be acted upon,” and Apple is a company that believes in “advancing humanity.”

Of course. Remember this?

I wonder if that deacon is still alive. I want him to see how vastly that one act of hatred has backfired…


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Only Apple

Posted on June 14th, 2014 at 10:36 by John Sinteur in category: Apple

[Quote]:

What we saw last week at WWDC 2014 would not have happened under Steve Jobs


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iOS 8 strikes an unexpected blow against location tracking

Posted on June 9th, 2014 at 23:18 by John Sinteur in category: Apple, If you're in marketing, kill yourself, Privacy

[Quote]:

It wasn’t touted onstage, but a new iOS 8 feature is set to cause havoc for location trackers, and score a major win for privacy. As spotted by Frederic Jacobs, the changes have to do with the MAC address used to identify devices within networks. When iOS 8 devices look for a connection, they randomize that address, effectively disguising any trace of the real device until it decides to connect to a network.

“Any phone using iOS 8 will be invisible to the process”

Why are iPhones checking out Wi-Fi networks in disguise? Because there’s an entire industry devoted to tracking customers through that signal. As The New York Times reported last summer, shops from Nordstrom’s to JC Penney have tried out the system. (London even tried out a system using public trash cans.) The system automatically logs any phone within Wi-Fi range, giving stores a complete record of who walked into the shop and when. But any phone using iOS 8 will be invisible to the process, potentially calling the whole system into question.


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Comments:

  1. I don’t think that Apple is doing thid for privacy, but in order to push retailers to use its iBeacon technology. And surely turning wifi off will prevent this sort of snooping?

Apple – iOS 8

Posted on June 3rd, 2014 at 8:29 by John Sinteur in category: Apple

[Quote]:

For the first time, iOS 8 opens up the keyboard to developers. And once new keyboards are available, you’ll be able to choose your favorite input method or layout systemwide.

Braille keyboard anyone?


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A Decade’s Worth of WWDC Keynotes

Posted on June 1st, 2014 at 22:03 by John Sinteur in category: Apple

[Quote]:

Here’s the truth about WWDC keynotes:

  • The fact that they’re part of a conference devoted to informing developers about Apple’s platforms means that the emphasis will be on software–particularly operating systems–and the odds of a radically new hardware product being announced are just about nil;
  • Since epoch-shifting hardware is out of the picture, any devices which do get announced are, by definition, only incrementally superior to their predecessors;
  • No matter how newsy the keynote is, some people–especially ones who were hoping for something extremely specific which didn’t get announced–will deem it a snoozefest;
  • There’s a very good chance that Apple’s stock will fall in the wake of the keynote, presumably indicating that Wall Steeet was not instantly impressed.


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Capture image via captureStillImageAsynchronouslyFromConnection with no shutter sound

Posted on May 24th, 2014 at 14:16 by John Sinteur in category: Apple, Software

Brilliant!


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As Publishers Fight Amazon, Books Vanish

Posted on May 24th, 2014 at 11:47 by John Sinteur in category: Amazon, Apple

[Quote]:

Amazon’s power over the publishing and bookselling industries is unrivaled in the modern era. Now it has started wielding its might in a more brazen way than ever before.

Seeking ever-higher payments from publishers to bolster its anemic bottom line, Amazon is holding books and authors hostage on two continents by delaying shipments and raising prices. The literary community is fearful and outraged — and practically begging for government intervention.

“How is this not extortion? You know, the thing that is illegal when the Mafia does it,” asked Dennis Loy Johnson of Melville House, echoing remarks being made across social media.

Amazon is, as usual, staying mum. “We talk when we have something to say,” Jeffrey P. Bezos, the founder and chief executive, said at the company’s annual meeting this week.

It’s a good thing the Justice Department fixed the ebook antitrust issues. Perhaps they need to punish Apple some more to take care of this?


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The Great Smartphone War: Apple vs. Samsung

Posted on May 6th, 2014 at 8:34 by John Sinteur in category: Apple

[Quote]:

According to various court records and people who have worked with Samsung, ignoring competitors’ patents is not uncommon for the Korean company. And once it’s caught it launches into the same sort of tactics used in the Apple case: countersue, delay, lose, delay, appeal, and then, when defeat is approaching, settle. “They never met a patent they didn’t think they might like to use, no matter who it belongs to,” says Sam Baxter, a patent lawyer who once handled a case for Samsung. “I represented [the Swedish telecommunications company] Ericsson, and they couldn’t lie if their lives depended on it, and I represented Samsung and they couldn’t tell the truth if their lives depended on it.”

[..]

It was the same old pattern: when caught red-handed, countersue, claiming Samsung actually owned the patent or another one that the plaintiff company had used. Then, as the litigation dragged on, snap up a greater share of the market and settle when Samsung imports were about to be barred. Sharp had filed its lawsuit in 2007; as the lawsuit played out, Samsung built up its flat-screen business until, by the end of 2009, it held 23.6 percent of the global market in TV sets, while Sharp had only 5.4 percent. All in all, not a bad outcome for Samsung.

The same thing happened with Pioneer, a Japanese multi-national that specializes in digital entertainment products, which holds patents related to plasma televisions. Samsung once again decided to use the technology without bothering to pay for it. In 2006, Pioneer sued in federal court in the Eastern District of Texas, so Samsung countersued. The Samsung claim was thrown out before trial, but one document revealed in the course of the litigation was particularly damaging—a memo from a Samsung engineer stating explicitly that the company was violating the Pioneer patent. A jury awarded Pioneer $59 million in 2008. But with appeals and continued battles looming, the financially troubled Pioneer agreed to settle with Samsung for an undisclosed amount in 2009. By then, it was too late. In 2010, Pioneer shut down its television operations, tossing 10,000 people out of work.

Even when other companies have honored competitors’ patents, Samsung has used the same technology for years without paying royalties. For example, a small Pennsylvania company named InterDigital developed and patented technology and was paid for its use under licensing agreements with such giant corporations as Apple and LG Electronics. But for years Samsung refused to cough up any cash, forcing InterDigital to go to court to enforce its patents. In 2008, shortly before the International Trade Commission was set to make a decision that could have banned the importation of some of Samsung’s most popular phones into the United States, Samsung settled, agreeing to pay $400 million to the tiny American company.


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Apple, Samsung, and Intel

Posted on April 17th, 2014 at 10:11 by John Sinteur in category: Apple

[Quote]:

Intel has already recognized that it is in the company’s long-term best interest to get into the ARM game in one capacity or another. At the same time, Intel no doubt has also recognized that it is not in the company’s short-term best interest to start producing large quantities of ARM-based chips for any company that asks. Intel has only so much production capacity, and the opportunity cost is too high to start producing low-margin ARM-based chips at the expense of its more profitable x64 processors. The company is at a crossroads: its short- and long-term best interests don’t align, and it has to choose one at the expense of the other.

That’s where Apple’s cash hoard comes in.

It’s interesting he doesn’t suggest Apple should outright buy Intel.

But as for building a chip factory for Intel, as well as the other worries he mentions, perhaps Apple should outright buy ASML to get a lead start on their EUV technology…


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Apple’s iPhone 5c ‘failure flop’ outsold Blackberry, Windows Phone and every Android flagship in Q4

Posted on March 22nd, 2014 at 18:02 by John Sinteur in category: Apple

[Quote]:

From the constant harping about the supposed “failure” of Apple’s iPhone 5c, you’d think the phone is selling poorly. The reality is that middle tier model, while dramatically less popular than Apple’s top of the line iPhone 5s, still managed to outsell every Blackberry, every Windows Phone and every Android flagship in the winter quarter, including Samsung’s Galaxy S4.


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Comments:

  1. You’d think that Apple was trying to gain marketshare with the new model rather than keep losing. ‘The constant harping’ was based on numbers as the quarterly earnings were not as predicted, and actually Apple’s own CEO Tim Cook had this to say about their middle tier model: “It was the first time we ever ran that play, and demand percentage turned out to be different than we thought.” ‘Different’ being the politically correct term for lack of expected succes, otherwise he would have bashed the success-drum a lot more loudly.

    The iPhone marketshare has been dropping for three years now, so even if it outsels the other models on individual basis (which is an odd comparison considering Apple sells two different new models now compared to many more from other manufacturers), that still does not make it the success it was intended to be.

Yahoo, Google and Apple also claim right to read user emails

Posted on March 22nd, 2014 at 16:48 by John Sinteur in category: Apple, Google, Microsoft, Privacy, Security

[Quote]:

Microsoft is not unique in claiming the right to read users’ emails – Apple, Yahoo and Google all reserve that right as well, the Guardian has determined.

The broad rights email providers claim for themselves has come to light following Microsoft’s admission that it read a journalist’s Hotmail account in an attempt to track down the source of an internal leak. But most webmail services claim the right to read users’ email if they believe that such access is necessary to protect their property.


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Apple Explains Exactly How Secure iMessage Really Is

Posted on March 1st, 2014 at 11:23 by John Sinteur in category: Apple

[Quote]:

Millions and millions of people use iMessage every day. But how many people know exactly what’s going on behind the scenes, or what happens to a message once you send it?

Maybe a handful. Up until now, the vast majority of what we knew about iMessage’s inner workings came from reverse engineering and best guesses. This week, however, Apple quietly released a document that breaks it all down.


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Tim Cook Soundly Rejects Politics of the NCPPR, Suggests Group Sell Apple’s Stock

Posted on March 1st, 2014 at 11:19 by John Sinteur in category: Apple

[Quote]:

Mr. Cook’s comments came during the question and answer session of Apple’s annual shareholder meeting, which the NCPPR attended as shareholder. The self-described conservative think tank was pushing a shareholder proposal that would have required Apple to disclose the costs of its sustainability programs and to be more transparent about its participation in “certain trade associations and business organizations promoting the amorphous concept of environmental sustainability.”

As I covered in depth yesterday, the proposal was politically-based, and rooted in the premise that humanity plays no role in climate change. Other language in the proposal advanced the idea that profits should be the only thing corporations consider.

That shareholder proposal was rejected by Apple’s shareholders, receiving just 2.95 percent of the vote. During the question and answer session, however, the NCPPR representative asked Mr. Cook two questions, both of which were in line with the principles espoused in the group’s proposal.

The first question challenged an assertion from Mr. Cook that Apple’s sustainability programs and goals—Apple plans on having 100 percent of its power come from green sources—are good for the bottom line. The representative asked Mr. Cook if that was the case only because of government subsidies on green energy.

Mr. Cook didn’t directly answer that question, but instead focused on the second question: the NCPPR representative asked Mr. Cook to commit right then and there to doing only those things that were profitable.

What ensued was the only time I can recall seeing Tim Cook angry, and he categorically rejected the worldview behind the NCPPR’s advocacy. He said that there are many things Apple does because they are right and just, and that a return on investment (ROI) was not the primary consideration on such issues.

“When we work on making our devices accessible by the blind,” he said, “I don’t consider the bloody ROI.” He said that the same thing about environmental issues, worker safety, and other areas where Apple is a leader.

As evidenced by the use of “bloody” in his response—the closest thing to public profanity I’ve ever seen from Mr. Cook–it was clear that he was quite angry. His body language changed, his face contracted, and he spoke in rapid fire sentences compared to the usual metered and controlled way he speaks.

He didn’t stop there, however, as he looked directly at the NCPPR representative and said, “If you want me to do things only for ROI reasons, you should get out of this stock.”

It was a clear rejection of the climate change denial, anything-for-the-sake-of-profits politics espoused by the NCPPR. It was also an unequivocal message that Apple would continue to invest in sustainable energy and related areas.


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Working Backwards to the Technology

Posted on February 26th, 2014 at 14:17 by John Sinteur in category: Apple

[Quote]:

At WWDC in 1997, Steve Jobs, having just returned to Apple, held a wide-open Q&A session. There’s video — albeit low-quality VHS transfer? — on YouTube. It’s a remarkable session, showing Jobs at his improvisational best. But more importantly, the philosophies and strategies Jobs expressed correctly forecast everything Apple went on to do under his leadership, and how the company continues to work today. In short, he’s remarkably open and honest — and prescient.


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Apple’s failure to pay for favorable media coverage flies in the face of Samsung’s payola

Posted on February 24th, 2014 at 18:12 by John Sinteur in category: Apple

[Quote]:

It would appear that if Apple wants to rein in the targeted negativity the tech media loves to dish out, it will need to begin spending billions like Samsung to promote tweets, push favorable reviews, pay spiffs as incentives to retail sale promotion and generously ply journalists with free products.


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Steve Jobs slated to grace US postage stamp in 2015

Posted on February 23rd, 2014 at 14:23 by John Sinteur in category: Apple

[Quote]:

The US Postal Service hopes Steve Jobs can do for it what he once did for Apple.

The late Apple co-founder will be featured on a commemorative US postage stamp in 2015, according to a US Postal Service list of approved subjects obtained by The Washington Post. Usually kept secret to maximize buzz over stamps’ subjects, the list includes subjects the post office plans to commemorate on stamps for the rest of this year and the next couple of years.

The stamp will be a little bit more expensive than usual and it comes only in 2 colors, it will have rounded corners.

And finally Apple haters can give his backside a lick…


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Comments:

  1. Knowing Mr. Jobs’ proclivities, it’ll be self-adhesive.

On the Timing of iOS’s SSL Vulnerability and Apple’s ‘Addition’ to the NSA’s PRISM Program

Posted on February 23rd, 2014 at 9:01 by John Sinteur in category: Apple, Security

[Quote]:

Jeffrey Grossman, on Twitter:

I have confirmed that the SSL vulnerability was introduced in iOS
6.0. It is not present in 5.1.1 and is in 6.0.

iOS 6.0 shipped on 24 September 2012.

According to slide 6 in the leaked PowerPoint deck on NSA’s PRISM program, Apple was “added” in October 2012.

These three facts prove nothing; it’s purely circumstantial. But the shoe fits.


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Comments:

  1. Jobs passed away a year before that. What do you think that this would have happened if he were still alive in 2012? Snowballs have a better chance in Hell I believe…

  2. Rumor has it Samsung is gonna copy and paste this bug in about 2 weeks.

A Gem From The Archives: We Revisit A Mac Doubter

Posted on January 26th, 2014 at 11:54 by John Sinteur in category: Apple

[Quote]:

PETER MCWILLIAMS: I think they’re hoping people are going to fork out $2,500 for a computer for their home. And I can’t see it.

ADAMS: What do you get for the $2,500 now?

MCWILLIAMS: What you get is a screen, a nine-inch screen. You get a keyboard. You get 128K of RAM, which is internal disk storage. And you get a 3-1/2-inch disk drive.

ADAMS: Let me translate a bit here or try to translate. You’re saying it has a very good memory. It has a 3-1/2-inch disk drive, which is not compatible with other computers. What’s the standard size, then?

MCWILLIAMS: The standard is five-and-a-quarter inch. And they have made a corporate decision that the 3-1/2-inch drive is going to make it. I don’t see it myself. But this whole computer is a calculated risk on Apple’s part. If the world is ready to accept a brand-new standard, this machine will make it. If it’s not, the machine won’t make it.

And it will have certain specialized applications like in architectural firms and so forth. But on the whole, it’s gambling that the world is ready to accept a new standard. My personal point of view is that the world is not.

BLOCK: That’s the late author Peter McWilliams, talking with our former host Noah Adams 30 years ago tomorrow, January 25th, 1984. They were talking about Apple’s Macintosh computer, which had just been introduced.


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Comments:

  1. Because generally authors make great tech commentators. *eyeroll*

Macintosh 128K Teardown – iFixit

Posted on January 25th, 2014 at 9:09 by John Sinteur in category: Apple

Finally!


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Happy 30th birthday!

Posted on January 24th, 2014 at 9:12 by John Sinteur in category: Apple

1984macintosh


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Samsung Vs Apple

Posted on January 13th, 2014 at 15:32 by John Sinteur in category: Apple, If you're in marketing, kill yourself

It’s hard to believe that the people who did the recent Apple ad and the people who did the recent Samsung ads live on the same planet.


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Comments:

  1. One promises sex with a snow bunny, the other eternal life. Which is more realistic?

  2. Apple is Tiffany, Samsung is Target.

  3. Sue – in my case, probably eternal life….

  4. @Mark: lol…did you consider joining the furries?

  5. The snow bunny? :-)

  6. I don’t know why, but when I was watching the Samsung commercial, I thought of those old Axe body spray commercials…

  7. To get a selfie, put the watch on the other wrist.

Qualcomm Employee: 64-Bit A7 Chip ‘Hit Us In The Gut’

Posted on December 17th, 2013 at 11:24 by John Sinteur in category: Apple

[Quote]:

“Apple kicked everybody in the balls with this. It’s being downplayed, but it set off panic in the industry.”


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Comments:

  1. He’s baaaaack!

Patent war goes nuclear: Microsoft, Apple-owned “Rockstar” sues Google

Posted on November 1st, 2013 at 16:01 by John Sinteur in category: Apple, Google, Intellectual Property, Microsoft

[Quote]:

Canada-based telecom Nortel went bankrupt in 2009 and sold its biggest asset—a portfolio of more than 6,000 patents covering 4G wireless innovations and a range of technologies—at an auction in 2011.

Google bid for the patents, but it didn’t get them. Instead, the patents went to a group of competitors—Microsoft, Apple, RIM, Ericsson, and Sony—operating under the name “Rockstar Bidco.” The companies together bid the shocking sum of $4.5 billion.

Patent insiders knew that the Nortel portfolio was the patent equivalent of a nuclear stockpile: dangerous in the wrong hands, and a bit scary even if held by a “responsible” party.

This afternoon, that stockpile was finally used for what pretty much everyone suspected it would be used for—launching an all-out patent attack on Google and Android. The smartphone patent wars have been underway for a few years now, and the eight lawsuits filed in federal court today by Rockstar Consortium mean that the conflict just hit DEFCON 1.

Google probably knew this was coming. When it lost out in the Nortel auction, the company’s top lawyer, David Drummond, complained that the Microsoft-Apple patent alliance was part of a “hostile, organized campaign against Android.” Google’s failure to get patents in the Nortel auction was seen as one of the driving factors in its $12.5 billion purchase of Motorola in 2011.

Rockstar, meanwhile, was pretty unapologetic about embracing the “patent troll” business model. Most trolls, of course, aren’t holding thousands of patents from a seminal technology company. When the company was profiled by Wired last year, about 25 of its 32 employees were former Nortel employees.

The suits filed today are against Google and seven companies that make Android smartphones: Asustek, HTC, Huawei, LG Electronics, Pantech, Samsung, and ZTE. The case was filed in the Eastern District of Texas, long considered a district friendly to patent plaintiffs.


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Comments:

  1. I am still amazed that the *scoundrels* who ran Nortel into the ground managed to get away it.

And Then Steve Said, ‘Let There Be an iPhone’

Posted on October 5th, 2013 at 10:07 by John Sinteur in category: Apple

[Quote]:

The preparations were top-secret. From Thursday through the end of the following week, Apple completely took over Moscone. Backstage, it built an eight-by-eight-foot electronics lab to house and test the iPhones. Next to that it built a greenroom with a sofa for Jobs. Then it posted more than a dozen security guards 24 hours a day in front of those rooms and at doors throughout the building. No one got in without having his or her ID electronically checked and compared with a master list that Jobs had personally approved. The auditorium where Jobs was rehearsing was off limits to all but a small group of executives. Jobs was so obsessed with leaks that he tried to have all the contractors Apple hired — from people manning booths and doing demos to those responsible for lighting and sound — sleep in the building the night before his presentation. Aides talked him out of it.


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Browsers!

Posted on September 26th, 2013 at 17:31 by John Sinteur in category: Apple, Google, Microsoft

556585_10202021677089195_1131533175_n


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Program halted after LA students breach school iPads’ security in a week

Posted on September 26th, 2013 at 9:22 by John Sinteur in category: Apple

[Quote]:

It took just a week for nearly 300 students who got iPads from their Los Angeles high school to figure out how to alter the security settings so they could surf the Web and access social media sites.

The breach at Roosevelt High and two other LA schools has prompted Los Angeles Unified School District officials to halt a $1 billion program aimed at putting the devices in the hands of every student in the nation’s second-largest school system, the Los Angeles Times reported. The district also has banned home use of the iPads until further notice as officials look for ways to make sure students use the devices for school work only.

This is indisputably educational. It probably only took one kid and one hour to do the crack, and a week to spread it to the rest of the school population. Why on Earth is anybody surprised about this? And why on Earth stop them? If you give them pen and paper, they quickly learn how to write notes to each other, but you don’t ban pen and paper because of that!


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Comments:

  1. The problem is that the iPads do nothing to help education and are an unnecessary expense. If computers and electronics made any difference, we’d have the smartest kids in the world. Most of them can’t do simple math in their heads.

Why is Apple so shifty about how it makes the iPhone?

Posted on September 25th, 2013 at 11:15 by John Sinteur in category: Apple

[Quote]:

Are you excited about the launch of Apple’s new iPhones? Have you decided to get one? Do you have any idea what you’re buying? If so, you are on your own. When asked where it obtains its minerals, Apple, which has done so much to persuade us that it is deft, cool and responsive, looks arrogant, lumbering and unaccountable.

The question was straightforward: does Apple buy tin from Bangka Island? The wriggling is almost comical.

Nearly half of global tin supplies are used to make solder for electronics. About 30% of the world’s tin comes from Bangka and Belitung islands in Indonesia, where an orgy of unregulated mining is reducing a rich and complex system of rainforests and gardens to a post-holocaust landscape of sand and acid subsoil. Tin dredgers in the coastal waters are also wiping out the coral, the giant clams, the local fisheries, the endangered Napoleon wrasse, the mangrove forests and the beaches used by breeding turtles.


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CCC | Chaos Computer Club breaks Apple TouchID

Posted on September 22nd, 2013 at 21:24 by John Sinteur in category: Apple

[Quote]:

The biometrics hacking team of the Chaos Computer Club (CCC) has successfully bypassed the biometric security of Apple’s TouchID using easy everyday means. A fingerprint of the phone user, photographed from a glass surface, was enough to create a fake finger that could unlock an iPhone 5s secured with TouchID. This demonstrates – again – that fingerprint biometrics is unsuitable as access control method and should be avoided.

Apple had released the new iPhone with a fingerprint sensor that was supposedly much more secure than previous fingerprint technology. A lot of bogus speculation about the marvels of the new technology and how hard to defeat it supposedly is had dominated the international technology press for days.

“In reality, Apple’s sensor has just a higher resolution compared to the sensors so far. So we only needed to ramp up the resolution of our fake”, said the hacker with the nickname Starbug, who performed the critical experiments that led to the successful circumvention of the fingerprint locking. “As we have said now for more than years, fingerprints should not be used to secure anything. You leave them everywhere, and it is far too easy to make fake fingers out of lifted prints.”


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Comments:

  1. I thought the sensor Apple’s using was supposed to be looking below the skin surface at deeper features? That now seems to be clealy wrong. If you find any decent commentary on that discrepancy, I’d love a link. The discussion at HackerNews is disappointing.

  2. “Deeper features?” Blood vessels, I imagine. Patterns are probably unique, but perhaps perhaps they are not consistently visible.


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