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Apple Watch Sneak Peek

Posted on October 1st, 2014 at 10:46 by John Sinteur in category: Apple, batshitinsane

If you thought people waiting in line to buy an iPhone 6 was batshitinsane, check this:

[Quote]:

Apple invited people to check out the new Apple Watch in person — for one day only — in Paris during Fashion Week, at the Colette boutique on Rue Saint Honoré.

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Comments:

  1. No one creates buzz like Apple. It’s the 8th wonder.

Inside the building where Apple tortures the iPhone 6

Posted on September 29th, 2014 at 23:59 by John Sinteur in category: Apple

[Quote]:

If you use enough force to bend an iPhone, or any phone, it’s going to deform.”


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iPhone hoax: No, you can’t recharge it in the microwave, LAPD warns

Posted on September 24th, 2014 at 14:29 by John Sinteur in category: Apple

[Quote]:

No, the latest iPhone software does not allow for the device to be quickly charged by heating it up in the microwave, despite some convincing, but very fake online ads.

Microwaving the phone will not only ruin the device, it could cause a fire or explosion, authorities said.

But a hoax floating around the Internet seemed so legitimate to some that even police are spreading the warning, as noted by the Los Angeles Police Department communications unit on Twitter.

So clearly, as if there was any doubt, iPhone users are not smarter than average.


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Comments:

  1. Apparently the fix for a bent iPhone 6+ is to put it in the microwave for 3 seconds.

  2. Wood grain finish? ZOMG, did I miss a trend or something?

Black Market Takes Over the iPhone 6 Lines

Posted on September 21st, 2014 at 14:16 by John Sinteur in category: Apple


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Joan Rivers posts from the grave: ‘I’ve just bought an iPhone!’

Posted on September 20th, 2014 at 15:29 by John Sinteur in category: Apple, If you're in marketing, kill yourself

[Quote]:

Comic legend Joan Rivers has been dead for over a week now, but apparently that hasn’t stopped the Fashion Show star being chuffed to bits with her new iPhone 6-feet-under.

In a warning to PR companies everywhere, sponsored scheduled posts appeared on Rivers’ Facebook and Instagram accounts on Friday morning – before they were quickly taken down.


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Comments:

  1. She would have died laughing!

Apple’s “warrant canary” disappears, suggesting new Patriot Act demands

Posted on September 19th, 2014 at 11:58 by John Sinteur in category: Apple

[Quote]:

When Apple published its first Transparency Report on government activity in late 2013, the document contained an important footnote that stated:

“Apple has never received an order under Section 215 of the USA Patriot Act. We would expect to challenge such an order if served on us.”

Writer and cyber-activist Cory Doctorow at the time recognized that language as a so-called “warrant canary,” which Apple was using to thwart the secrecy imposed by the Patriot Act.

Warrant canaries are a tool used by companies and publishers to signify to their users that, so far, they have not been subject to a given type of law enforcement request such as a secret subpoena. If the canary disappears, then it is likely the situation has changed — and the company has been subject to such request.

Now, Apple’s warrant canary has disappeared. A review of the company’s last two Transparency Reports, covering the second half of 2013 and the first six months of 2014, shows that the “canary” language is no longer there.


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Sep 18, 2007, seven years ago

Posted on September 18th, 2014 at 9:27 by John Sinteur in category: Apple, Microsoft


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Comments:

  1. Of the characters in this wee psychodrama a couple are deceased; Mr. Jobs and Nortel. I guess you could also say that Mr. Ballmer and Microsoft are gone from the game.

  2. 2007?? Now way, this is late ’70s or earyly’80s. Jobs sais Apple has 500 people working. He talks about the Apple II. This is pre Mac (i.e., pre 1984).

  3. Sorry, I must have clicked on some link after the Balmer video. :-) It’s good: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GfxxRKBgos8

  4. @Jan-Mark: Hmm…1970’s…Did Mr. Ballmer have hair?

How do launch numbers for iPhones and Samsung Galaxy S phones compare?

Posted on September 16th, 2014 at 11:42 by John Sinteur in category: Apple, Google

[Quote]:

Some rivalries will never die — chocolate vs peanut butter, Yankees vs Red Sox, and iPhone vs Android, just to name a few. With the announcement of the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, many Android users took to the Internet to loudly exclaim how underwhelmed they were by the devices. Its new features were things they’d already had for years, except for all the ones that weren’t, of course. Rivalries are fun, but the musings of voices on the Internet aren’t nearly as important as the voices of the buying public. And when you compare the launch numbers of various Samsung Galaxy S phones to the iPhone 6 and earlier iPhones, there’s absolutely no competition.

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And still the overall market share of Android is higher. I think it’s because people who get an iPhone make a conscious choice to do so, and (most) people who get an android do so because they walk into a store and tell the sales rep they want “a phone”. They will make calls, use facebook, make a selfie, and that’s it. They never download an app unless recommended by a friend (“get snapchat!”), and just use the phone as a phone and are very happy with it.


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Comments:

  1. I don’t think that android users are attached to a brand. In my case, I have chosen between several brands before buying the phone, (Samsung, Sony, LG…). In addition, I’ve chosen and “old” model that runs smoothly the latest Android version, I’ve been waiting and studying several models. I would say that buying an iPhone the first day is not a conscious choice but an impulsive one. In addition, just released products have flaws, so buying it the first day is more like being a tester.

    I use several app, all free, among them you can find the “Rain Alert”, Maps (also offline), email, google drive (spreadsheets, documents), games…

    In Android, there are plenty of choices of high-end and other market segments phones. There are a lot app, but I think that Android users usually go for the free ones.

  2. Purchasing of iPhones may be social signalling of wealth and taste for some. Other people are excited by technology and like to try out new stuff. These are conditioned reactions to marketing not actually impulses. All these users are wealthy enough to make that choice and regularly buy new devices. These are nice products for nice people.

    What’s the marketing opposite of the “long tail”?

    Disclaimer: I bought my Android phone from a yard sale. I forgot the brand.

  3. One very simple factor: in the iOS ecosystem, there are 3 viable models right now. How many high-end-ish phones does Samsung have? S4 and S5 in several editions (regular, mini, active); Edge; Note; Duos… AT&T wireless has 10 listed as currently available. Sales in the Android domain are split over more models.

  4. There’s another gotcha in this graph: the Apple numbers are all for the first 1-3 days only, and the Samsung numbers are for 30-60 days. But the numbers are *per*day* sales. So Samsung had those lower numbers consistently over 30 days, and we don’t know what the drop-off was in Apple’s numbers. I don’t doubt that Apple’s numbers are higher, but this chart is deceptive.

  5. No, I don’t think that’s the gotcha. That’s the whole point of the graph. the iPad 3 had 1 mil of sales in 3 days, the S5, in 30 days, has yet to reach that number. Maybe it would have been clearer to have all bars at the same number of days, but then the samsung stuff would be 1 pixel on the left side of the graph..

  6. You are not comparing like with like. It’s a false comparison and the sort of sub high school use of stats that Apple cultists trot out to prove that their gang is the bestest ever, like deranged One Direction fans.

    When I upgraded from my Samsung S3 earlier this year I had a wealth of options to choose from (of which the Iphone was one) offering different combinations of features, allowing me to select the one that best suited me.

    With Apple, an upgrade means a choice of 1. New iphones are an event. So yes, if you are a devotee you are naturally going to want the latest iteration and you will want it as soon as it comes out. With Android there is no such pressure to upgrade to the latest model, as there are new and improved models coming out all the time. A new Samusung simply is not a big thing that will drive people to preorder.

    I can’t wait to find out what is wrong with the new iphone as 4 million people at once find out that holding it the wrong way cuts the signal, or syncing it with the cloud wipes everything or some such.

    For the record I switched to HTC.

  7. @John: The graph clearly says “units/day”. It’s meant to deceive.

  8. Or rather, it says “units/day” once you pay attention. It’s not actually *clear*, which is that makes it deceptive.

Apple Pay Details: Apple Gets 0.15% Cut of Purchases, Higher Rates for Bluetooth Payments

Posted on September 13th, 2014 at 10:34 by John Sinteur in category: Apple

[Quote]:

According to a new report from The Financial Times, Apple stands to make quite a bit of money from its payments service. Banks and payment networks will be forking over 0.15 percent of each purchase to Apple, which equates to 15 cents out of a $100 purchase.
They are also paying hard cash for the privilege of being involved: 15 cents of a $100 purchase will go to the iPhone maker, according to two people familiar with the terms of the agreement, which are not public. That is an unprecedented deal, giving Apple a share of the payments’ economics that rivals such as Google do not get for their services

According to bank executives, Apple was able to negotiate with so many partners and receive choice deals because the industry didn’t see anything threatening in Apple Pay. One executive suggested that Apple’s payment model continued to put banks “at the centre of payments.” Apple may also have been able to negotiate better deals due to the tight security it has in place for Apple Pay. Payments will be made via NFC with a one-time token, and also secured with a Touch ID fingerprint.


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Comments:

  1. Whatever threats they saw were probably overcome when they were offered an apparently magical solution to a problem that is considered perpetual, boring and difficult in banking.

  2. Yeah. And let’s see just how fast a man-in-the-middle attack will be successfully made. I would guess less than a month from when the phone is released to the public. 1. Intercept token. 2. Re-vector it to credit the malefactors instead of the real store. Oops – where did my $$ go? Why does the store want their $$? I paid, didn’t I?

  3. It’s cool that they managed to negotiate that, but it’s going to be noise on Apple’s income statements for a looooong time.

Why the iPhone 6 Plus is the must-have phone for Manchester United fans!

Posted on September 12th, 2014 at 12:35 by John Sinteur in category: Apple

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Cyanide & Happiness #3678

Posted on September 10th, 2014 at 9:36 by John Sinteur in category: Apple

[Quote]:

910


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Comments:

  1. I bought Apple stock a couple of weeks later. It had fallen to $15 per share in post-9/11 trading.

Images of apple wearables confirmed

Posted on September 9th, 2014 at 9:17 by John Sinteur in category: Apple

There’s not much time now before the announcement, and some pictures of the apple wearables have leaked. These are confirmed as having come from Apple.
1. http://i.imgur.com/DOwUPh.jpg
2. http://i.imgur.com/5aAu9h.jpg (apple logo clearly visible)
3. http://i.imgur.com/XrFzih.jpg (showing range of colors)
4. http://i.imgur.com/PpLv1h.jpg (hinting at a future google glass competitor?)


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Comments:

  1. oh god i hope these leaks are true; I’ll buy that white one immediately!

  2. *cough* :-)

  3. @des – clearly you don’t realize that the new Apple wearables allow you travel back to the ’80’s.

  4. S’OK, I owned enough apple schwag in the 80s, don’t need to live that again. I’ll take the watch instead. :)

    I thought Tim Cook was going to pay U2 for the album by giving them each a watch, but no.

The Joy of Tech comic… Apple Event Survival Kit!

Posted on September 8th, 2014 at 9:17 by John Sinteur in category: Apple, Cartoon

[Quote]:

2043


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Apple courts fashionistas as smartwatch expectations mount

Posted on September 6th, 2014 at 21:41 by John Sinteur in category: Apple

[Quote]:

Apple Inc has invited top fashion editors and bloggers in unprecedented numbers to its Tuesday launch gala, further evidence that the iPhone maker is preparing to take the wraps off a smartwatch.


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Wearables

Posted on September 4th, 2014 at 10:49 by John Sinteur in category: Apple

[Quote]:

According to a designer who works at Apple, Jonathan Ive, Apple’s design chief, in bragging about how cool he thought the iWatch was shaping up to be, gleefully said Switzerland is in trouble — though he chose a much bolder term for “trouble” to express how he thought the watchmaking nation might be in a tough predicament when Apple’s watch comes out.


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Comments:

  1. They are going to release a $50,000 watch?

The Police Tool That Pervs Use to Steal Nude Pics From Apple’s iCloud

Posted on September 3rd, 2014 at 10:18 by John Sinteur in category: Apple, Do you feel safer yet?, Privacy, Security

[Quote]:

As nude celebrity photos spilled onto the web over the weekend, blame for the scandal has rotated from the scumbag hackers who stole the images to a researcher who released a tool used to crack victims’ iCloud passwords to Apple, whose security flaws may have made that cracking exploit possible in the first place. But one step in the hackers’ sext-stealing playbook has been ignored—a piece of software designed to let cops and spies siphon data from iPhones, but is instead being used by pervy criminals themselves.

On the web forum Anon-IB, one of the most popular anonymous image boards for posting stolen nude selfies, hackers openly discuss using a piece of software called EPPB or Elcomsoft Phone Password Breaker to download their victims’ data from iCloud backups. That software is sold by Moscow-based forensics firm Elcomsoft and intended for government agency customers. In combination with iCloud credentials obtained with iBrute, the password-cracking software for iCloud released on Github over the weekend, EPPB lets anyone impersonate a victim’s iPhone and download its full backup rather than the more limited data accessible on iCloud.com. And as of Tuesday, it was still being used to steal revealing photos and post them on Anon-IB’s forum.

[..]

The fact that Apple isn’t complicit in law enforcement’s use of Elcomsoft’s for surveillance doesn’t make the tool any less dangerous, argues Matt Blaze, a computer science professor at the University of Pennsylvania and frequent critic of government spying methods. “What this demonstrates is that even without explicit backdoors, law enforcement has powerful tools that might not always stay inside law enforcement,” he says. “You have to ask if you trust law enforcement. But even if you do trust law enforcement, you have to ask whether other people will get access to these tools, and how they’ll use them.”


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Apple Issues Media Advisory Related to Celebrity Photo Theft

Posted on September 3rd, 2014 at 0:11 by John Sinteur in category: Apple, Privacy, Security

[Quote]:

Apple issued a media advisory related to recent celebrity photo theft, saying the accounts were compromised by a very targeted attack on users names, password and security questions and was not related to any breach of Apple’s systems, including iCloud.

Over the weekend a number of nude celebrity photos appeared online. Jennifer Lawrence, Kate Upton, Lea Michele, Victoria Justice and Kirsten Dunst all had their photos comprised, among others.

We wanted to provide an update to our investigation into the theft of photos of certain celebrities. When we learned of the theft, we were outraged and immediately mobilized Apple’s engineers to discover the source. Our customers’ privacy and security are of utmost importance to us. After more than 40 hours of investigation, we have discovered that certain celebrity accounts were compromised by a very targeted attack on user names, passwords and security questions, a practice that has become all too common on the Internet. None of the cases we have investigated has resulted from any breach in any of Apple’s systems including iCloud® or Find my iPhone. We are continuing to work with law enforcement to help identify the criminals involved.

To protect against this type of attack, we advise all users to always use a strong password and enable two-step verification. Both of these are addressed on our website athttp://support.apple.com/kb/ht4232.

If you are a celebrity, it’s more likely that people know the name of your first pet, or your mothers maiden name…


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Comments:

  1. Right John, it is why I advise people to make up random letters and numbers for those all too frequently used security questions. Also, never use the same answer twice.

9 September, Apple Media Event

Posted on September 2nd, 2014 at 13:03 by John Sinteur in category: Apple

Rumors are pretty solid about the iPhone 6, but it’s unclear if there’s going to be any wearables, iWatches, or similar.

And the rumors about them are as varied as the rumors were about the original iPhone. So, how accurate are those rumors? Take a look at what people predicted the iPhone will look like, and take that as a reference…

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Comments:

  1. Tim Cook at D11 2013 on the subject

  2. I’ll correct a couple of letters in one word:

    “And the rumors about them are as vapid as the rumors were about the original iPhone.”

  3. An interesting observation is the pace of the iOS 8 beta releases. Usually it’s every 2 weeks right up to GM at the day of the media event. This time they’ve not done a beta for a few weeks, and it’s unlikely they will do one between now and next week.

    So, looks like they are hiding some major new feature.

Apple Building Massive Structure at Flint Center for iPhone 6 Event

Posted on August 29th, 2014 at 21:38 by John Sinteur in category: Apple

[Quote]:

For the occasion, it appears that Apple has been building a massive structure on the campus, which has been kept under tight wraps with a white barricade. A MacRumors reader has sent in images of a mysterious structure at the Flint Center, which appears to span three stories and is protected by “scads” of security people. Administrators had previously declined to comment on what the structure is for, stating only “We are not at liberty to discuss that due to client wishes.”

flintcenter

Apple has not held an event at the Flint Center in many years, so the company’s return to the site of the original Mac unveiling suggests its upcoming announcement will be a major one. The Flint Center has a much higher seating capacity than other venues where Apple has unveiled products in the past, including the Yerba Buena Center and its own Cupertino campus.

Could be just a “here’s a new iPhone model, and it has NFC” but somehow it feels different. I’m going to keep a spare set of pants on standby.


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Boneh Publications: Gyrophone: Recognizing Speech From Gyroscope Signals

Posted on August 23rd, 2014 at 23:42 by John Sinteur in category: Apple, Google

[Quote]:

We show that the MEMS gyroscopes found on modern smart phones are sufficiently sensitive to measure acoustic signals in the vicinity of the phone. The resulting signals contain only very low-frequency information (<200Hz). Nevertheless we show, using signal processing and machine learning, that this information is sufficient to identify speaker information and even parse speech. Since iOS and Android require no special permissions to access the gyro, our results show that apps and active web content that cannot access the microphone can nevertheless eavesdrop on speech in the vicinity of the phone.


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Comments:

  1. Angela Merkel’s phone just got dropped down an elevator shaft, again.

  2. Bit iOS apps don’t get to do much in the background, so is this feasible on iOS?

  3. Correct. That’s why all those fitness apps use the gps+accelerometer instead.

RTFM 0day in iOS apps: G+, Gmail, FB Messenger, etc.

Posted on August 22nd, 2014 at 15:35 by John Sinteur in category: Apple

[Quote]:

Apple’s documentation on the tel scheme is really short and easy to read. While reading the first paragraph something caught my attention:

When a user taps a telephone link in a webpage, iOS displays an alert asking if the user really wants to dial the phone number and initiates dialing if the user accepts. When a user opens a URL with the tel scheme in a native app, iOS does not display an alert and initiates dialing without further prompting the user.

So if I click the link in Safari I get the prompt asking me to confirm my action, if I click the link in a native app’s webView it doesn’t ask and performs the action right away (makes the call).

Do people read documentation?

No. And it’s bad.

I instantly assumed people do read documentation so there was no way a big player like Facebook, Twitter, Google, LinkedIn, etc. would do such a silly mistake… but I was wrong.


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Comments:

  1. Nice!

Inside Apple’s Internal Training Program

Posted on August 11th, 2014 at 10:11 by John Sinteur in category: Apple

[Quote]:

Apple may well be the only tech company on the planet that would dare compare itself to Picasso.

In a class at the company’s internal training program, the so-called Apple University, the instructor likened the 11 lithographs that make up Picasso’s “The Bull” to the way Apple builds its smartphones and other devices. The idea: Apple designers strive for simplicity just as Picasso eliminated details to create a great work of art.

Steven P. Jobs established Apple University as a way to inculcate employees into Apple’s business culture and educate them about its history, particularly as the company grew and the tech business changed. Courses are not required, only recommended, but getting new employees to enroll is rarely a problem.

Although many companies have such internal programs, sometimes referred to as indoctrination, Apple’s version is a topic of speculation and fascination in the tech world.

It is highly secretive and rarely written about, referred to briefly in the biography of Mr. Jobs by Walter Isaacson. Apple employees are discouraged from talking about the company in general, and the classes are no exception. No pictures of the classrooms have surfaced publicly. And a spokeswoman for Apple declined to make instructors available for interviews for this article.


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YES, iPhones ARE getting slower with each new release of iOS

Posted on August 9th, 2014 at 10:39 by John Sinteur in category: Apple

[Quote]:

There’s a nice little feuilleton in the New York Times looking at why everyone whines about their iPhone slowing down when Apple releases a new variant.

Starting from a personal complaint by a professor, one of his students looks at the incidence for “iPhone slow” in Google Trends and notes that there’s a leap every time a new model is released.


That is released – not announced – so it must come from actual use, rather than just thinking that it isn’t quite up to date.

It’s also noted that releases of new Samsung models do not coincide so strongly with leaps in similar search terms. Obviously there’s something specific to Apple here, and that’s that major upgrades to the iPhone coincide with upgrades to iOS, something which 90 per cent of iPhone users will implement.

Famously, Android users do not tend to upgrade their OS over time. So, we might think that this observed slow-down is a result of trying to run the new OS on old hardware which isn’t quite up to supporting it. And we’d probably be right there.

However, we can now go off on our own and go a little further than this. For what’s really remarkable about these OS upgrades is how good Apple has been at keeping new versions of iOS compatible with old versions of hardware. No one at all would suggest running today’s Samsung bloatware (that bit that floats around on top of Android) on hardware three years old. But it seems perfectly acceptable to be running this year’s iOS on old kit. It’s also at this point that we can wander off into a couple of bits of economics for illumination.


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Russia wants Apple, SAP to cooperate against foreign spying

Posted on July 30th, 2014 at 21:56 by John Sinteur in category: Apple

[Quote]:

Russia has proposed that Apple Inc and SAP hand the government access to their source code to make sure their widely used products are not tools for spying on state institutions.

Riiiight…


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App Rot

Posted on July 29th, 2014 at 18:08 by John Sinteur in category: Apple

[Quote]:

Apple’s App Store design is a big part of the problem. The dominance and prominence of “top lists” stratifies the top 0.02% so far above everyone else that the entire ecosystem is encouraged to design for a theoretical top-list placement that, by definition, won’t happen to 99.98% of them. Top lists reward apps that get people to download them, regardless of quality or long-term use, so that’s what most developers optimize for. Profits at the top are so massive that the promise alone attracts vast floods of spam, sleaziness, clones, and ripoffs.

Quality, sustainability, and updates are almost irrelevant to App Store success and usually aren’t rewarded as much as we think they should be, and that’s mostly the fault of Apple’s lazy reliance on top lists instead of more editorial selections and better search.

The best thing Apple could do to increase the quality of apps is remove every top list from the App Store.


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NeXT vs Sun

Posted on July 21st, 2014 at 17:17 by John Sinteur in category: Apple

[Quote]:

In 1991 Steve Jobs’ company commissioned an head-to-head programming competition to show how much faster and easier it was to program a NeXT computer vs a Sun workstation. The NeXT operating system went on to be the foundation for Apple’s Macintosh OS-X about a decade later.


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Comments:

  1. Well, would I rather have learned to use NeXTstep or Devguide? Not sure. For the type of programs shown here, relative simple GUI plus simple key-value storage, sure, but for writing all the other stuff, not sure. But what I don’t get is that the Sun guy can’t display Postscript on a NeWS system using Devguide? That looks fishy. Personally, I would have used neither NeXTstep nor Devguide and saved a lot of money off the bat. My code would have been somewhat portable. ;-P I wonder what would happen nowadays if a free/open source buff would take on this challenge, as a web-app, against a seasoned Visual Studio coder.

  2. Why a web-app? How about a three-way battle between the Microsoft platform (Visual Studio and all the technologies that go along with it), XCode and all the Apple technologies, and Google?

    And have the requirements be something modern as well – with a social/mobile part (perhaps location based, sales people in the field exchanging some information, with push notifications and all that), scalable to millions of users, with user interfaces for at least three device families (phone/tablet/PC)?

    Then web technologies would be just a small part of the task. We’ve come a long way since 1991, let the challenge reflect that.

Skybox Can Predict iPhone Launch Using Satellite Imagery

Posted on June 17th, 2014 at 8:49 by John Sinteur in category: Apple, Google

[Quote]:

By the time its entire fleet of 24 satellites has launched in 2018, Skybox will be imaging the entire Earth at a resolution sufficient to capture, for example, real-time video of cars driving down the highway. And it will be doing it three times a day.

The ability to take such frequent imaging will certainly aid Google’s Maps product, but it also opens up a market for competitive intelligence. Skybox says they are already looking at Foxconn every week and are able to pinpoint the next iPhone release based on the density of trucks outside their manufacturing facilities.


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When He Was A Young Man In Alabama, Tim Cook Stumbled Upon A KKK Cross Burning

Posted on June 15th, 2014 at 22:20 by John Sinteur in category: Apple

[Quote]:

This NYT profile of Tim Cook opens with a harrowing anecdote from the Apple CEO’s early life in 1970s Alabama:

Bicycling home on a new 10-speed, [Cook] passed a large cross in flames in front of a house — one that he knew belonged to a black family. Around the cross were Klansmen, dressed in white cloaks and hoods, chanting racial slurs. Mr. Cook heard glass break, maybe someone throwing something through a window. He yelled, “Stop!”

One of the men lifted his conical hood, and Mr. Cook recognized a deacon from a local church (not Mr. Cook’s). Startled, he pedaled away.

Reflecting on this event in December during his acceptance speech for Auburn University’s International Quality of Life Award, he said, “This image was permanently imprinted in my brain, and it would change my life forever” — human rights and dignity are “values that need to be acted upon,” and Apple is a company that believes in “advancing humanity.”

Of course. Remember this?

I wonder if that deacon is still alive. I want him to see how vastly that one act of hatred has backfired…


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Only Apple

Posted on June 14th, 2014 at 10:36 by John Sinteur in category: Apple

[Quote]:

What we saw last week at WWDC 2014 would not have happened under Steve Jobs


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iOS 8 strikes an unexpected blow against location tracking

Posted on June 9th, 2014 at 23:18 by John Sinteur in category: Apple, If you're in marketing, kill yourself, Privacy

[Quote]:

It wasn’t touted onstage, but a new iOS 8 feature is set to cause havoc for location trackers, and score a major win for privacy. As spotted by Frederic Jacobs, the changes have to do with the MAC address used to identify devices within networks. When iOS 8 devices look for a connection, they randomize that address, effectively disguising any trace of the real device until it decides to connect to a network.

“Any phone using iOS 8 will be invisible to the process”

Why are iPhones checking out Wi-Fi networks in disguise? Because there’s an entire industry devoted to tracking customers through that signal. As The New York Times reported last summer, shops from Nordstrom’s to JC Penney have tried out the system. (London even tried out a system using public trash cans.) The system automatically logs any phone within Wi-Fi range, giving stores a complete record of who walked into the shop and when. But any phone using iOS 8 will be invisible to the process, potentially calling the whole system into question.


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Comments:

  1. I don’t think that Apple is doing thid for privacy, but in order to push retailers to use its iBeacon technology. And surely turning wifi off will prevent this sort of snooping?


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