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Google Keep—Save what’s on your mind

Posted on March 22nd, 2013 at 7:57 by John Sinteur in category: Google

[Quote]:

Every day we all see, hear or think of things we need to remember. Usually we grab a pad of sticky-notes, scribble a reminder and put it on the desk, the fridge or the relevant page of a magazine. Unfortunately, if you’re like me you probably often discover that the desk, fridge or magazine wasn’t such a clever place to leave the note after all…it’s rarely where you need it when you need it.

To solve this problem we’ve created Google Keep. With Keep you can quickly jot ideas down when you think of them and even include checklists and photos to keep track of what’s important to you. Your notes are safely stored in Google Drive and synced to all your devices so you can always have them at hand.

From the same guys that brought you Google Reader, so good luck if you don’t mind being bitten again.


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Comments:

  1. After seeing this, I’m not sure how it beats OneNote. Less flexible, on fewer platforms and shows less info in a less organized way…

  2. Hah…this sound like Google Notebook (b. 2006 d. 2011, after a prolonged illness).

    There have been millions of suckers born since then.

  3. I’ll stick with Evernote #google reader fail

Why I left Google – James Whittaker

Posted on March 19th, 2013 at 14:39 by Desiato in category: Google

[Quote]:

It wasn’t an easy decision to leave Google. During my time there I became fairly passionate about the company. I keynoted four Google Developer Day events, two Google Test Automation Conferences and was a prolific contributor to the Google testing blog. Recruiters often asked me to help sell high priority candidates on the company. No one had to ask me twice to promote Google and no one was more surprised than me when I could no longer do so. In fact, my last three months working for Google was a whirlwind of desperation, trying in vain to get my passion back.

The Google I was passionate about was a technology company that empowered its employees to innovate. The Google I left was an advertising company with a single corporate-mandated focus.

Technically I suppose Google has always been an advertising company, but for the better part of the last three years, it didn’t feel like one. Google was an ad company only in the sense that a good TV show is an ad company: having great content attracts advertisers.


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Adblock Plus for Android removed from Google Play store

Posted on March 14th, 2013 at 14:56 by John Sinteur in category: Google

[Quote]:

In a rather surprising move, Google removed Adblock Plus and other ad blocking apps from the Google Play store due to “interference with another service or product in an unauthorized manner.”


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Comments:

  1. More impetus to have an open source mobile OS. Google is just another money grubbing greedy corporation that hides behind their “do no evil” slogan while screwing you royally. Sort of like catholic church come to think of it.

  2. @Mykolas: It was (I think) “Don’t be evil” which is different from “Do no evil”.

  3. @SueW – Indeed you are correct! http://investor.google.com/corporate/code-of-conduct.html

    But “Don’t be evil” is much more than that. Yes, it’s about providing our users unbiased access to information, focusing on their needs and giving them the best products and services that we can. But it’s also about doing the right thing more generally – following the law, acting honorably and treating each other with respect. ….The Google Code of Conduct is one of the ways we put “Don’t be evil” into practice. It’s built around the recognition that everything we do in connection with our work at Google will be, and should be, measured against the highest possible standards of ethical business conduct. ”

    Comment “Ethical Standard” And amorphous concept that affords Google the loopholes needed to abuse its users

Can’t be a coincidence!

Posted on March 14th, 2013 at 13:26 by John Sinteur in category: Google, Pastafarian News

2LXeTKg


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Comments:

  1. Hands up, all those who will stop using Chrome.

Google admits WebM infringes H.264 patents

Posted on March 12th, 2013 at 7:48 by John Sinteur in category: Google

[Quote]:

Daniel Eran Dilger:

Almost three years after Google released its WebM video encoding technology as a “free” and open alternative to the existing H.264 backed by Apple and others, it has admitted its position was wrong and that it would pay to license the patents WebM infringes.

Looks like we’re establishing a clear pattern: Google clearly (and often willfully) infringes on someone else’s IP, can’t believe that it’ll ever have any repercussions, and claims they’re doing it to be “open” or some bullshit. It betrays a culture at Google’s highest levels of arrogance, entitlement, and dishonesty.


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Microsoft backs law banning Google Apps from schools

Posted on March 9th, 2013 at 10:45 by John Sinteur in category: Google, Microsoft

[Quote]:

Microsoft is backing a bill in Massachusetts that would effectively force schools to stop using Google Apps, or any other service that uses students’ data.

“Any person who provides a cloud computing service to an educational institution operating within the State shall process data of a student enrolled in kindergarten through twelfth grade for the sole purpose of providing the cloud computing service to the educational institution and shall not process such data for any commercial purpose, including but not limited to advertising purposes that benefit the cloud computing service provider,” the bill states.

The proposed legislation was introduced by state representative Carlo Basile (D-East Boston), and Microsoft has said it is supporting it, using the old canard of wanting to protect children from harm. Blocking Google and other providers that use an ad-funded service model is just a side benefit, it seems.


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Comments:

  1. But didn’t Bill Gates just give money to a project that collects students’ data at a remarkable level?

Why Nobody Can Copy Apple

Posted on February 28th, 2013 at 8:09 by John Sinteur in category: Apple, Google, Microsoft

[Quote]:

In my experience, the behaviors and culture of an organization (large or small) that focuses on the Consumer as a customer is diametrically incompatible with the behaviors and culture of an organization that focuses on Business as a customer.

I feel strongly that this is a key reason Microsoft’s products are often good, but not excellent; the consumer ones and the business ones. This is why Google will never be able to beat Apple at Apple’s game: Google’s customer focus is split between the advertiser and consumer.  

The behaviors of organization, which are really driven by the attitudes, actions, priorities of the people, define what the organization produces. The behaviors required to delight the consumer are simply at odds with the behaviors required to delight businesses. You cannot do both simultaneously in a single organization and be excellent.


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Comments:

  1. IF this is actually the case (and I’m somewhat skeptical about the explanatory power of these kinds of theories), but IF this is actually the case, then the competitor to watch is Amazon.

  2. I have been using Apple stuff for 2 years now. I failed to notice where “Apple focuses on the Consumer” as opposed to “Apple focusing on profit, and ignoring the consumer”.

    Microsoft fulfills more consumer (business or private) requests than Apple, the company that simply ignores consumer requests and proceeds the way it wants.

Google Glass – If I Had Glass

Posted on February 20th, 2013 at 18:15 by John Sinteur in category: Google

Dear Google,

If you had told me five years ago that I’d have the chance to pay $1,500 to beta test and advertise a product for you I would’ve said ‘get the heck out of town’! But here we are.


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Comments:

  1. But your Twitter feed is protected, so Google won’t see your #ifihadglass tweets. :)

Google Patents Staple of ’70s Mainframe Computing

Posted on February 20th, 2013 at 14:34 by John Sinteur in category: Google, Intellectual Property

[Quote]:

“‘The lack of interest, the disdain for history is what makes computing not-quite-a-field,’ Alan Kay once lamented. And so it should come as no surprise that the USPTO granted Google a patent Tuesday for the Automatic Deletion of Temporary Files, perhaps unaware that the search giant’s claimed invention is essentially a somewhat kludgy variation on file expiration processing, a staple of circa-1970 IBM mainframe computing and subsequent disk management software. From Google’s 2013 patent: ‘A path name for a file system directory can be “C:temp\12-1-1999\” to indicate that files contained within the file system directory will expire on Dec. 1, 1999.’ From Judith Rattenbury’s 1971 Introduction to the IBM 360 computer and OS/JCL: ‘EXPDT=70365 With this expiration date specified, the data set will not be scratched or overwritten without special operator action until the 365th day of 1970.’ Hey, things are new if you’ve never seen them before!”


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Comments:

  1. I guess that Google figures that if everyone else who is suing it have totally stupid patents, then it needs its own to defend against them… M.A.D. doesn’t even do this justice!

Official Google Blog: An update on our war against account hijackers

Posted on February 20th, 2013 at 7:53 by John Sinteur in category: Google

[Quote]:

With stolen passwords in hand, attackers attempt to break into accounts across the web and across many different services. We’ve seen a single attacker using stolen passwords to attempt to break into a million different Google accounts every single day, for weeks at a time. A different gang attempted sign-ins at a rate of more than 100 accounts per second. Other services are often more vulnerable to this type of attack, but when someone tries to log into your Google Account, our security system does more than just check that a password is correct.

Every time you sign in to Google, whether via your web browser once a month or an email program that checks for new mail every five minutes, our system performs a complex risk analysis to determine how likely it is that the sign-in really comes from you. In fact, there are more than 120 variables that can factor into how a decision is made.

If a sign-in is deemed suspicious or risky for some reason—maybe it’s coming from a country oceans away from your last sign-in—we ask some simple questions about your account. For example, we may ask for the phone number associated with your account, or for the answer to your security question. These questions are normally hard for a hijacker to solve, but are easy for the real owner. Using security measures like these, we’ve dramatically reduced the number of compromised accounts by 99.7 percent since the peak of these hijacking attempts in 2011.


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EU antitrust chief hints at forced changes for Google

Posted on January 11th, 2013 at 12:57 by John Sinteur in category: Google

[Quote]:

Google is abusing its dominant place in the search market, according to Europe’s antitrust chief Joaquin Almunia.

In an interview with the Financial Times of London, Google could be forced to change the way that it provides and displays search results or face antitrust charges for “diverting traffic,” in the words of Almunia, referring to Google’s self-serving treatment to its own search services.

Despite the U.S. Federal Trade Commission’s move earlier this month to let off Google with a slap on the wrist — albiet, a change to its business practices, a move that financially wouldn’t dent Google in the short term but something any company would seek to avoid — the European Commission is looking to take a somewhat different approach: take its time, and then hit the company hard.

Almunia said in the interview: “We are still investigating, but my conviction is [Google] are diverting traffic,” adding: “They are monetising this kind of business, the strong position they have in the general search market and this is not only a dominant position, I think — I fear — there is an abuse of this dominant position.”

That’s pretty much as black and white as one can get, short of actually saying: “Google, bad! Here’s a whopping great big fine.”


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Comments:

  1. Google isn’t the only search engine out there (yahoo! bing, et al) that people can choose to use. Does this pinhead (Almunia) think they don’t do the same as Google? That’s the name of competition. For all its warts, Google provides the best overall search experience on the Net, and filtering out ads for the most part is not difficult.

    In any case, this term “diverting traffic” in this context is extremely troubling to me. All internet services “divert” traffic – that’s just the way it works. Before Almunia tries to tell people how to run their internet businesses, he should first learn how it works!

Google enabling Maps access for Windows Phone after uproar

Posted on January 6th, 2013 at 15:26 by John Sinteur in category: Google, Microsoft

[Quote]:

The Google Maps on Windows Phone debacle looks like it will be resolved after all. Google now says that it is in fact planning to get rid of the redirect that’s preventing Windows Phone users from accessing the Google Maps website using Internet Explorer — “soon,” even.

So it isn’t IE incompatibility after all, right? You just got caught.


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Misspelling “Windows Phone” Makes Google Maps Work

Posted on January 5th, 2013 at 19:56 by John Sinteur in category: Google, Microsoft


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End of World Means Most Amazing Home Page Ever, Says Google

Posted on December 19th, 2012 at 8:59 by Desiato in category: awesome, Google

[Quote]:

“People are freaking out about the world coming to an end—I totally get that,” said the Google C.E.O. Larry Page in a conference call with reporters. “But at Google we view the Apocalypse as a unique opportunity. This company was founded with the goal to ‘organize the world’s information’ and we see the next three days as our chance to get that done.”As for the marching orders that Page gave to Google’s team of designers: “The world is going to be destroyed and mankind will cease to exist. Make Google the last page they see, and give us one last chance to serve them tracking cookies.”


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Schmidt ‘very proud’ of Google’s tiny tax bill: ‘It’s called capitalism’

Posted on December 14th, 2012 at 1:57 by John Sinteur in category: Google, Robber Barons

[Quote]:

Google executive chairman Eric Schmidt has dismissed criticism over how little corporation tax his company pays, saying it’s just capitalism.

Schmidt is “very proud” of the corporate structure Google set up to divert profits made in European countries, such as the UK, to its firms in the low-tax havens of Ireland and The Netherlands, thus minimising its tax bill.

“We pay lots of taxes; we pay them in the legally prescribed ways,” he told Bloomberg. “I am very proud of the structure that we set up. We did it based on the incentives that the governments offered us to operate.

“It’s called capitalism. We are proudly capitalistic. I’m not confused about this.”

[..]

“Using dubious tactics dubbed the ‘Double Irish’ and the ‘Dutch Sandwich’, Google apparently was able to pay only 3.2 per cent in tax on its overseas profits in 2011 even though most of its sales were in countries with tax rates from 26 to 34 per cent,” the group’s privacy project director John Simpson said in the letter.


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Shit Android Fanatics Say

Posted on October 25th, 2012 at 16:40 by John Sinteur in category: Apple, Google


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Google Data centers

Posted on October 17th, 2012 at 17:45 by John Sinteur in category: Google


[Quote]:

Take a look inside Google’s high-tech data centers


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Comments:

  1. And on street view, you can see their security team

Apple-Samsung Case Muddies the Future of Innovation

Posted on August 28th, 2012 at 10:31 by John Sinteur in category: Apple, Google

[Quote]:

Whether consumers respond by buying the more distinctive devices is another question entirely.

Consider the case of Windows Phone, Microsoft’s operating system for smartphones, which looks almost nothing like the Apple software for iPhones and iPads. Reviewers have praised Windows Phone for its fresh, distinctive design, with bold typography and a tile system for using phone functions.

But the phones, including the Lumia 900 from Nokia, have not sold well.

Microsoft’s product has not gained traction for a number of possible reasons, among them the big lead its rivals had in the marketplace and the relatively weak distribution of its main partner, Nokia. But the experience shows that any flourishing of innovative products prompted by the Samsung verdict may not translate into success for Apple’s rivals.

So this guy argues that because a company that DOES innovate isn’t doing well, other companies should not have to innovate and just copy Apple, and the fact that they should be allowed to copy Apple is GOOD for innovation?

Look, I dislike this patent war as much as the next guy, but this is ridiculous.


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Comments:

  1. The logic is flawed, but so is your argument about copying, because it implies Apple is the only one innovating and all the others do is copy. Both companies have copied their fair share of ideas. I agree the patent wars are ridiculous, but this one jury call doesn’t make the copied design claim just. I’ve seen the manipulated photo’s entered by Apple to prove their point, and read most of these claims have so far been dismissed by professional judges. I’ve also seen the 2001 version of the iPad before Apple designed the iPad – the resemblance is quite striking.
    I wish both companies (and all the others too) would put all this patent war effort into creating better products at a better price – if we needn’t pay for the lawsuits and shareholder profit, things would truly improve. Then again, I’m considering becoming a lawyer again, so I may alter my point of view accordingly ;)

Google admits it did not delete Street View data

Posted on July 27th, 2012 at 21:37 by John Sinteur in category: Google, Privacy

[Quote]:

Google Inc said on Friday it had not kept its promise to delete all the personal data, such as emails, its Street View cars collected in Britain and other countries in 2010.


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How to prepare for Google’s acquisition of Sparrow

Posted on July 21st, 2012 at 21:04 by Paul Jay in category: Google


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‘This might be the worst unboxing in the history of the world’

Posted on July 16th, 2012 at 18:42 by Paul Jay in category: Google

source


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Comments:

  1. And I know that I, for one, laughed when we learned a couple of years ago that Apple has teams dedicated solely to the packaging and unboxing process for each of its devices…

  2. Am I the only one who thought those guys were not exactly the sharpest? (pun intended) not that the box wasn’t badly designed but come on…

Google to pay $0 to Oracle for their lawsuit

Posted on June 21st, 2012 at 15:12 by John Sinteur in category: Google

[Quote]:

In a hearing in the US District Court today, it was determined that Google will pay a net total of nothing for Oracle’s patent claims against them. In fact, Google is given 14 days to file an application for Oracle to pay legal fees to Google(in a similar manner to how things are done for frivolous lawsuits). However, it is not quite peaches and roses for Google, as Oracle is planning on appealing the decision in the case.

This is obviously very good news for Google, but we will have to see what happens with Oracle’s appeal. Of course, appeals for most cases are to be expected(especially with a case like this one, which was heavily watched, and has a large impact on the Software and IT industries as a whole).


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Dear Eric Schmidt, It’s Been 6 Months — Where Are Those iOS-Slaying Android Exclusive Apps?

Posted on June 8th, 2012 at 8:54 by John Sinteur in category: Google

[Quote]:

He predicted that by this date, developers would be making their apps for Android first. And that’s simply not happening. Sure, there are a few here and there that do it. But for the most part, the situation remains the same. In the hearts and minds of top app developers, it’s iOS first and Android second — or not at all.

The same is true for the vast majority of new startups — I talk with dozens each week. The refrain: iOS first. Android second. Down the road. At some point. Maybe.

So why was Schmidt so wrong? In my mind, there are a number of reasons — the same ones I went into in my initial post. The ability to make money is the most important. But the most interesting reason again ties into something Schmidt said back in December:

“With the ICS release our core objective as a company is to get all of the hardware vendors onto that platform.”

I mean, he really said that. And it’s unbelievable because it’s perhaps the most epic fail in the history of epic fails. Google’s “core objective as a company” was to get hardware vendors onto Ice Cream Sandwich (aka Android 4.0), and as of June 1 — seven months after the launch of the OS — 7.1 percent of Android phones are actually on it. Seven. Point. One. Percent.

That number isn’t from some bullshit survey of a few hundred devices or some propaganda from Apple — it’s the number published by Google itself. And it’s pathetic.


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Comments:

  1. Dunno. So far what I see is 60-70% of the apps I use are available on both for my Android and my iPhone (either the same one or an alternative).
    The rest are a toss up: some are not available on the Android and some are not available on the iPhone.
    But definitely, Android apps didn’t kill the iPhone apps.
    And as for ICS – well, providers do NOT want to upgrade existing phones. Handset makers do NOT want to upgrade. They want you to buy new.

The Problem With “Unbiased” Gadget Reviews

Posted on June 2nd, 2012 at 8:51 by John Sinteur in category: Apple, Google

[Quote]:

Perhaps no review has ever painted a better picture of the problem with “unbiased” reviews of technology than David Pogue’s review of the Samsung Galaxy Player 4.2, the iPod touch of Android. There’ve been a lot of reviews in a lot of publications that don’t help anybody buy anything — the very thing they’re supposed to do! — but this review is amazing in how wildly successful it is as saying absolutely nothing useful about the product at hand.

Pogue, ostensibly to please a vocal, angry contingency of fanboys, bends over backwards so hard to say nice things about the Galaxy Player 4.2 that he practically begins to eat himself, so that every good thing he says about it is immediately negated in the same thought. The screen is fantastic, except for when you open your eyes.


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  1. Triumph of hope over experience: asking a dead-tree journal to objectively review a product.

‘In Ad Network Nightmare, Microsoft Making “Do Not Track” Default for IE 10′

Posted on June 1st, 2012 at 22:59 by John Sinteur in category: Google, If you're in marketing, kill yourself, Microsoft

[Quote]:

So let me get this straight. Advertising networks that track user behavior are OK with “Do Not Track” only so long as a single-digit percentage of users have it turned on? But if a lot of people start using it they’re out? Not being able to track users across the web is a “nightmare” for ad networks?

Years ago I had the idea that if Microsoft really wanted to destroy Google, they should have released a version of IE with a built-in on-by-default ad-blocker that included Google ads in its blacklist.


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Judge Alsup Rules: Oracle’s Java APIs are Not Copyrightable

Posted on June 1st, 2012 at 10:01 by John Sinteur in category: Google, Intellectual Property

[Quote]:

Feast your eyes on this! Oracle’s Java APIs, specifically as used by Google, are not copyrightable. “Therefore, Oracle’s claim based on Google’s copying of the 37 API packages, including their structure, sequence and organization is DISMISSED,” the judge writes.


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Jury: Google did not infringe Oracle patents with Android

Posted on May 24th, 2012 at 10:12 by John Sinteur in category: Google

[Quote]:

Over a week after it began deliberations, the jury has returned a verdict in the patent infringement case between Oracle and Google, finding that the search giant did not infringe upon Oracle’s patents with Android. In play were infringement counts on eight different claims across two separate patents: RE38,104 and 6,061,520. Given the decision, there will be no need for a damages phase in connection with the patent claims, and with the recent agreement by Google and Oracle to postpone any damages hearings related to copyright infringement, the jury has now been dismissed from the proceedings altogether. Judge William Alsup thanked the jurors for their hard work before they left the courtroom, noting that “this is the longest trial, civil trial, I’ve ever been in.”

It’s the final victory in several trial coups for Google. While the jury did find that Android infringed Oracle copyrights by its use of the the structure, sequence, and organization of 37 Java APIs, the jury was unable to reach a unanimous verdict on whether it was covered under fair use, rendering the verdict moot for the moment. The jury found that Google had infringed on only one other copyright count — the use of nine lines of rangeCheck code — though Judge Alsup later ruled that Google had also infringed by its use of eight Java test files in Android, adding a second minor infringement count to Google’s plate.

“It’s the final victory in several coups for Google”

While the jury’s involvement has come to an end, there are still several outstanding questions. Judge Alsup has yet to rule on whether the SSO of the Java APIs can be copyrighted in the first place; the jury was asked to come to their findings under the assumption that it was.


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Comments:

  1. Encouraging.

Great Googley Moogley

Posted on May 22nd, 2012 at 20:20 by John Sinteur in category: awesome, Google

[Quote]:

Celebrating the memory of beloved synth pioneer Bob Moog and commemorating his birthday, Google’s home page (currently in Australia, live in the US tomorrow) is a fully working, multi-trackable Moog synthesizer. Share your masterpiece!


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Court allows NSA and Google to keep their ties secret

Posted on May 12th, 2012 at 11:24 by John Sinteur in category: Do you feel safer yet?, Google, Privacy

[Quote]:

A federal appeals court has refused to force the US National Security Agency to explain any involvement it has had with Web giant Google, citing that a revelation could threaten the entire United States government.


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iOS

Posted on May 8th, 2012 at 22:27 by John Sinteur in category: Apple, Google

[Quote]:

Apple shipped iOS 5.1.1 yesterday. iPhone 3GSs bought in June 2009 are eligible to upgrade to iOS 5.1.1 today. How many Android phones from 2009 are running an even vaguely up to date OS? None.


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Comments:

  1. It might technically ‘run’ the OS, which is indeed commendable, but I certainly remember huge performance issues and complete lock-ups with running iOS4 on a previous generation of iPhone, and of course other features are just simply not available.

    I think this really only emphasises that the iPhone series has a much more narrow range of hardware to take into consideration compared to the Android handsets out there, and that’s about it.

  2. This must be the smuggest post ever put on this otherwise excellent blog. 35 words and yet there is so much wrong with it.

  3. There’s not much wrong with reality.
    iOS 5 runs fine on my 3GS.
    Not as fast as on a 4 or 4GS, but it runs nice.

  4. I think smug would be more like: “Since Android is open, customers can compile and install new versions themselves. Providers don’t have to deploy new versions to old phones, the open source community can take care of it!”


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