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Windows 8: The Animated Evaluation

Posted on January 7th, 2013 at 13:27 by John Sinteur in category: Microsoft


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  1. Excellent. But a few inaccuracies. Windows 7 still available. Also the stapled analogy was good, but not the first time. Recall window 3.x and to more limited extent win95 were stapled on top of DOS. Hard to teach old dog new tricks. There are many 3rd party apps to make Win8 look and more useable like Windows 7 ui. Of course if one needs to do this, there is no reason to use windows 8.

  2. This is both perceptive and funny, why did he give it such a long test period, I hated Windows 8 after ten minutes and, after finding it so difficult and confusing to navigate, it became history.

Google enabling Maps access for Windows Phone after uproar

Posted on January 6th, 2013 at 15:26 by John Sinteur in category: Google, Microsoft

[Quote]:

The Google Maps on Windows Phone debacle looks like it will be resolved after all. Google now says that it is in fact planning to get rid of the redirect that’s preventing Windows Phone users from accessing the Google Maps website using Internet Explorer — “soon,” even.

So it isn’t IE incompatibility after all, right? You just got caught.


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Misspelling “Windows Phone” Makes Google Maps Work

Posted on January 5th, 2013 at 19:56 by John Sinteur in category: Google, Microsoft


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Popularity

Posted on January 5th, 2013 at 13:09 by John Sinteur in category: Apple, Microsoft

GPbQj


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Comments:

  1. There is too such a thing as an iPad 4; it’s the one that was launched the same time as the iPad Mini.

‘We are screwed!’ Fonts eat a bullet in Microsoft security patch

Posted on December 22nd, 2012 at 13:21 by John Sinteur in category: Microsoft

[Quote]:

Windows users were surprised to find that a Microsoft security update stopped fonts from working on their PCs.


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Microsoft Security Essentials loses AV-Test certificate

Posted on November 30th, 2012 at 12:43 by John Sinteur in category: Microsoft

[Quote]:

Every two months, AV-Test takes a look at popular antivirus software and security suites and tests them in several ways. In their latest test which was performed on Windows 7 during September and October, Microsoft Security Essentials didn’t pass the test to achieve certification. Although that may not sound that impressive, Microsoft’s program was the only one which didn’t receive AV-Test’s certificate. For comparison, the other free antivirus software, including Avast, AVG and Panda Cloud did.

I remember about a year ago, there was an article where Microsoft was one of the best. Either the playing field changes rapidly, or all these tests are bogus.


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The amount of crap computer users have to put up with is incredible

Posted on November 11th, 2012 at 13:50 by John Sinteur in category: Microsoft, Software

[Quote]:

The bottom line is that this isn’t about Microsoft, HP, Apple or Adobe. It’s about all of them, and how bad the experience has become. While many of these issues can be fixed, checkboxes unchecked, and so on, I feel like as time goes on, every company is trying to come up with any possible idea that they can garner in order to screw their customers over, in most cases just to make an extra buck. The simple fact is that most people don’t go through the trouble is fixing all of this crap, they just put up with it, and that’s exactly what companies count on.


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Comments:

  1. Yesterday I had to install a new win7 pro system on a small customer network. 6 hours of hell. The print drivers alone were a headache. HP should be put out of their misery IMO. And then came crapware removal and next that bloated behemoth quickbooks which even in 2012 does not understand that users should not run in the administrator group. The amount of firewall gymnastics to get to behave for a standard user was amazing. These days I advise customers to do VDI (virtual desktop)and ditch the PC and instead use a thin client end user device. Yeah, setting up a terminal/citrix server is a headache, but it’s once and not each time a new workstation is installed. And these days, I only do workstations if customers allow me to swear at it while doing the install. I swore a lot yesterday.

  2. It’s OK Mykolas, there is a rate sheet for swearing that you can post in your workplace. Then you can tell your customer that you are raising money for charity. It’s not unreasonable and will encourage an improved tone around your efforts to wrest usability from crap (10 cents).

    Swear box tariff:
    (denominated in your local currency units)

    0.50 Female anatomy
    0.30 Male anatomy
    0.25 Unisex anatomy
    0.25 Incestual relations
    0.20 Other sexual activity
    0.10 Bestiality
    0.10 Blasphemy
    0.10 Bodily functions (excluding sexual acts)
    0.10 Ordure and assorted excrement

  3. Oh I forgot one:

    0.05 Euphemisms (e.g tabarnouche, heck).

  4. @SueW :-)

  5. I guess Win7 Pro = Professional Hell.

Microsoft’s security team is killing it: Not one product on Kaspersky’s top 10 vulnerabilities list

Posted on November 3rd, 2012 at 13:23 by John Sinteur in category: Microsoft

[Quote]:

Security firm Kaspersky has released its latest IT Threat Evolution report. There were some interesting findings in the report, as always, but the most interesting thing that stuck out was all the way at the bottom:

Microsoft products no longer feature among the Top 10 products with vulnerabilities. This is because the automatic updates mechanism has now been well developed in recent versions of Windows OS.

On the Top 10 list: Adobe (5 times), Oracle (2 times), Apple (2 times), and Winamp AVI.


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Verizon’s Windows Phone 8 Devices Could Be Delayed or Canceled

Posted on October 19th, 2012 at 17:07 by John Sinteur in category: Microsoft

[Quote]:

Rumor has it that mobile phone carrier Verizon Wireless has delayed the launch of Windows Phone 8 handsets on its network, and that it might even cancel them due to a series of issues with the management software.

[..]

Verizon requires for all smartphones on its network to be opened to remote management, yet Microsoft is reportedly refusing to provide the carrier with this feature at the moment.


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Comments:

  1. Did Apple give Verizon remote management features for the iPhone?

  2. Nope. That’s why initially it was exclusive to AT&T

Data Centers in Rural Washington State Gobble Power

Posted on September 24th, 2012 at 10:49 by John Sinteur in category: Microsoft

[Quote]:

Then came a showdown late last year between the utility and Microsoft, whose hardball tactics shocked some local officials.

In an attempt to erase a $210,000 penalty the utility said the company owed for underestimating its power use, Microsoft proceeded to simply waste millions of watts of electricity, records show. Then it threatened to continue burning power in what it acknowledged was an “unnecessarily wasteful” way until the fine was substantially cut, according to documents obtained by The New York Times.

“For a company of that size and that nature, and with all the ‘green’ things they advertised to me, that was an insult,” said Randall Allred, a utility commissioner and local farmer.

A Microsoft spokeswoman said the episode was “a one-time event that was quickly resolved.”


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Comments:

  1. When the contract with the power utility penalizes you for using less power than you thought you might, something’s fundamentally messed up.

  2. Problem is with the energy grid. They plan X MegaWatts to be used up, and generate that much. If it is not used up, then they can’t simply store it.
    If they generate less that’s not good either. Electricity is not like boots – not sold today, will sell tomorrow.
    Also when they “overproduce” they have to stop the generator, and then restart later which costs a lot. Electricity grids have yearly production/consumption plans for this exact reason.

    At least, that’s what I remember from my studies. Not absolutely precise, but something like that :)

  3. Remember that this is hydro power; the whole point of the data center being where it is is to be next to the dam that generates the power. So they’re not starting up or spinning down some coal or gas powered plant. It’s easy to throttle a hydro plant: either let the turbine run disconnected from the generator.

    I do agree with your bigger point that demand planning is hard and the better the power companies do, then the less fuel is wasted. But that doesn’t excuse the fact that they set up perverted incentives where Microsoft would pay more if they saved power than if they used it. They decided to make that point and, hey, look, the incentives were changed.

Melinda Gates’ New Crusade: Investing Billions in Women’s Health

Posted on September 6th, 2012 at 22:31 by John Sinteur in category: awesome, Microsoft

[Quote]:

“When I started to realize that that needed to get done in family planning, I finally said, OK, I’m the person that’s going to do that,”


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Comments:

  1. Good. I’d vote her for pope.

  2. From same article:

    By the early 1960s, Dwight Eisenhower was calling for foreign aid for birth control in The Saturday Evening Post, and he and Harry Truman became honorary chairmen of Planned Parenthood.

How Microsoft Lost Its Mojo: Steve Ballmer and Corporate America’s Most Spectacular Decline

Posted on September 4th, 2012 at 0:45 by John Sinteur in category: Microsoft

[Quote]:

The story of Microsoft’s lost decade could serve as a business-school case study on the pitfalls of success. For what began as a lean competition machine led by young visionaries of unparalleled talent has mutated into something bloated and bureaucracy-laden, with an internal culture that unintentionally rewards managers who strangle innovative ideas that might threaten the established order of things.

By the dawn of the millennium, the hallways at Microsoft were no longer home to barefoot programmers in Hawaiian shirts working through nights and weekends toward a common goal of excellence; instead, life behind the thick corporate walls had become staid and brutish. Fiefdoms had taken root, and a mastery of internal politics emerged as key to career success.

In those years Microsoft had stepped up its efforts to cripple competitors, but—because of a series of astonishingly foolish management decisions—the competitors being crippled were often co-workers at Microsoft, instead of other companies. Staffers were rewarded not just for doing well but for making sure that their colleagues failed. As a result, the company was consumed by an endless series of internal knife fights. Potential market-busting businesses—such as e-book and smartphone technology—were killed, derailed, or delayed amid bickering and power plays.

That is the portrait of Microsoft depicted in interviews with dozens of current and former executives, as well as in thousands of pages of internal documents and legal records.

“They used to point their finger at IBM and laugh,” said Bill Hill, a former Microsoft manager. “Now they’ve become the thing they despised.”


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What if Microsoft’s new logo style was applied to other famous brands?

Posted on August 25th, 2012 at 8:41 by John Sinteur in category: Apple, Microsoft

[Quote]:

Microsoft’s new logo, unveiled yesterday, is a bold departure from tradition because it’s the first to feature a visual symbol alongside the familiar wordmark. This sudden outburst of color from the typically staid company has inevitably stimulated designers’ imaginations, and one product from it has been a gallery posted on Tumblr showing what other famous brands would look like if they underwent the same minimalist treatment.


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Comments:

  1. So, has Microsoft patented the box yet? … :rolleyes:

You can’t block Facebook using Windows 8′s hosts file

Posted on August 19th, 2012 at 17:40 by John Sinteur in category: Microsoft

[Quote]:

While you can still add any host you want to the hosts file and map it to an IP, you will notice that some of the mappings will get reset once you open an Internet browser. If you only save, close and re-open the hosts file you will still see the new mappings in the the file, but once you open a web browser, some of them are removed automatically from the hosts file.

Two of the sites that you can’t block using the hosts file are facebook.com and ad.doubleclick.net, the former the most popular social networking site, the second a popular ad serving domain.

Anybody have Windows 8 installed and to try this?


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Comments:

  1. To correct the misinformation:
    turning off Windows Defender, which basically is Microsoft Security Essentials, in Windows 8 will resolve the issue. It appears that the program has been designed to protect some hosts from being added to the Windows hosts file. To turn off Windows Defender press the Windows key, type Windows Defender and hit enter. This launches the program. Switch to Settings here and select Administrator on the left. Locate Turn on Windows Defender and uncheck the preference and click save changes afterwards.

    If you do not want to disable Windows Defender completely, you can alternatively add the hosts file to the list of excluded files and processes. You do that with a on Settings > Excluded files and locations. This basically blocks Windows Defender from scanning or manipulating the hosts file in the operating system.

  2. Sounds like a bug if this is the only way it can distinguish FB from malware.

Microsoft sticks to default Do Not Track settings in IE 10

Posted on August 8th, 2012 at 15:14 by John Sinteur in category: Microsoft, Privacy

[Quote]:

When Microsoft shipped its Release Preview of Windows 8 in June, it announced that the default browser, Internet Explorer 10, would have the Do Not Track (DNT) signal enabled by default. That action unleashed a heated debate in the Tracking Protection Working Group of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).

To the advertising and analytics companies that make up the tracking industry, this issue is an existential one. If the default browser in the world’s most popular operating system is set to disallow tracking, the effect would be profoundly disruptive to companies that live and die by their ability to follow users around the web.

After much discussion, the working group agreed that DNT could only be turned on by a browser if that decision “reflects the user’s preference.” The result was a consensus by the working group that a browser (technically, a user-agent) should not enable DNT by default.

Today, Microsoft answered those critics by saying it still intends to enable DNT in Internet Explorer in IE 10. But the final released version will make one concession, according to Microsoft Chief Privacy Officer Brendon Lynch, who announced the decision in a blog post


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Comments:

  1. From farther down:

    One of Microsoft’s most ardent foes in this debate is Mike Zaneis, SVP & General Counsel of the Interactive Advertising Bureau, who has argued strenuously that the tracking industry should feel free to ignore DNT signals from anyone using any browser that enables DNT by default:

    Sounds a bit like a lose-lose situation.

  2. The only way to be sure is to use a browser that doesn’t send the request in the first place. That way, there’s no DNT flag for the tracking site to ignore.

    In other words, to use AdBlock.

Apple TV outsells Xbox 360 in latest quarter, still a ‘hobby’

Posted on July 25th, 2012 at 22:00 by John Sinteur in category: Apple, Microsoft

[Quote]:

Apple sold 1.3 million Apple TV devices during the June quarter, an increase of 170 percent over the same quarter a year ago.

That still qualifies as a “hobby,” according to Apple CEO Tim Cook, who disclosed the number in response to an analyst’s question on the company’s earnings conference call. But here’s an interesting data point: Microsoft sold 1.1 million Xbox 360s worldwide during the same time period.


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Skype won’t comment on whether it can now eavesdrop on conversations.

Posted on July 22nd, 2012 at 16:08 by John Sinteur in category: Microsoft, Privacy, Security

[Quote]:

Historically, Skype has been a major barrier to law enforcement agencies. Using strong encryption and complex peer-to-peer network connections, Skype was considered by most to be virtually impossible to intercept. Police forces in Germany complained in 2007 that they couldn’t spy on Skype calls and even hired a company to develop covert Trojans to record suspects’ chats. At around the same time, Skype happily went on record saying that it could not conduct wiretaps because of its “peer-to-peer architecture and encryption techniques.”

Recently, however, hackers alleged that Skype made a change to its architecture this spring that could possibly make it easier to enable “lawful interception” of calls. Skype rejected the charge in a comment issued to the website Extremetech, saying the restructure was an upgrade and had nothing to do with surveillance. But when I repeatedly questioned the company on Wednesday whether it could currently facilitate wiretap requests, a clear answer was not forthcoming. Citing “company policy,” Skype PR man Chaim Haas wouldn’t confirm or deny, telling me only that the chat service “co-operates with law enforcement agencies as much as is legally and technically possible.”

So what has changed? In May 2011, Microsoft bought over Skype for $8.5 billion. One month later, in June, Microsoft was granted a patent for “legal intercept” technology designed to be used with VOIP services like Skype to “silently copy communication transmitted via the communication session.” Whether this technology was subsequently integrated into the Skype architecture, it’s impossible to say for sure.


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Comments:

  1. And if you think that MS has your best interests at heart … good luck with that!

  2. Time to start a discussion on Skype alternatives

Microsoft reports first quarterly loss ever

Posted on July 20th, 2012 at 4:24 by John Sinteur in category: Microsoft

[Quote]:

Microsoft, the once-dominant computer software giant that has seen its fortunes wane in recent years, posted its first quarterly loss since emerging as a public company in 1986 Thursday as it took a huge charge for a failed acquisition.

The Redmond, Wash.-based company reported a net loss of $492 million as its operating income was wiped out by a $6.2 billion writedown related to its acquisition of advertising company aQuantive in 2007. Microsoft wrote down almost the entire $6.3 billion purchase price.


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Comments:

  1. But, if we put that 5 years old, one off that had to be written now in one chunk aside, they ended up with a $5.7billion profit.

    So still not that bad.

  2. If Balmer was responsible for that acquisition, then he should be fired, without his golden parachute. If Gates was the mover behind it, then he should relinquish an equal value in his stocks/options in MS. If executives are not held accountable for decisions this bad, then where is the accountability? … Oh, I forgot, there isn’t any in Corporate America…

  3. MS latest version of office looks to be a bloated monstrosity, and their next OS looks to be MS version of Unity, ask Ubuntu how that worked out. Which seems to leave them beating the house on doing well in the mobile market, not going to be easy and I they are a long way behind.

Nokia Lumia 900 Now $50: But Do You Want It?

Posted on July 16th, 2012 at 15:01 by John Sinteur in category: Microsoft

[Quote]:

AT&T recently dropped the price of Nokia’s flagship phone, the Windows Phone-powered Nokia Lumia 900, to $50 with a new two-year contract. It’s a great deal for a high end phone that was already pretty cheap at the original price of $100, when most popular phones sell for $200. But is Nokia’s phone worth it, even at $50?

The problem with the Lumia 900 is that it’s essentially a dead end from a technology perspective. In the fall, Microsoft is rolling out Windows Phone 8, the next generation version of its new mobile platform. And all current Windows Phone devices can’t upgrade to the new OS. Sure, Microsoft will be upgrading current Windows Phone 7.5 devices to Windows 7.8, but is that enough to convince you to live with the Lumia 900 for the length of a two-year contract with AT&T?


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Microsoft’s Downfall: Inside the Executive E-mails and Cannibalistic Culture That Felled a Tech Giant

Posted on July 5th, 2012 at 1:44 by John Sinteur in category: Microsoft

[Quote]:

Eichenwald’s conversations reveal that a management system known as “stack ranking”—a program that forces every unit to declare a certain percentage of employees as top performers, good performers, average, and poor—effectively crippled Microsoft’s ability to innovate. “Every current and former Microsoft employee I interviewed—every one—cited stack ranking as the most destructive process inside of Microsoft, something that drove out untold numbers of employees,” Eichenwald writes. “If you were on a team of 10 people, you walked in the first day knowing that, no matter how good everyone was, 2 people were going to get a great review, 7 were going to get mediocre reviews, and 1 was going to get a terrible review,” says a former software developer. “It leads to employees focusing on competing with each other rather than competing with other companies.”

When Eichenwald asks Brian Cody, a former Microsoft engineer, whether a review of him was ever based on the quality of his work, Cody says, “It was always much less about how I could become a better engineer and much more about my need to improve my visibility among other managers.” Ed McCahill, who worked at Microsoft as a marketing manager for 16 years, says, “You look at the Windows Phone and you can’t help but wonder, How did Microsoft squander the lead they had with the Windows CE devices? They had a great lead, they were years ahead. And they completely blew it. And they completely blew it because of the bureaucracy.”


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Comments:

  1. Hilarious – the management fads of the past are all having their obvious result.

  2. Doesn’t everyone do this by one name or another?

  3. Probably paid a fortune to management consultants who nothing more than recent grads charge $$$/hr. regurgitating the latest management fads to dumbshit MS managers who do not know ethernet from ether alcohol or their ass from a hole in ground as the expression goes.

Microsoft’s new tab, Surface, freezes during the presentation

Posted on June 20th, 2012 at 22:11 by John Sinteur in category: Microsoft


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  1. OMG, Balmer’s lost weight?

  2. Perhaps he has to scratch the surface to make it work.

Microsoft develops mood-matching ad engine

Posted on June 14th, 2012 at 8:24 by John Sinteur in category: If you're in marketing, kill yourself, Microsoft

[Quote]:

Microsoft has filed for a technology patent which will allow advertisers to push their advertising to consumers based on their emotional states and recent behaviours and activities.

The platform works across devices, tracking and monitoring the online activity data of consumers stored in logs including browsing history, web page content, search queries, emails, instant messages, videos from webcams, gestures from a computing device, e.g., Microsoft Kinect and results from online games.

The technology created by a group of resident Microserfers goes on to process the online activity identifying a tone associated with content that the user interacted with, receiving an indication of the user’s reaction to the content and assigning an emotional state to the user based on the tone of the content and the indication of the user’s reaction to the content.

The user’s reaction is identified from facial expressions of the user captured by an image capture device during the time period of usage. Advertisers then provide targeting data that includes the desired emotional states of users it intends to target and the ads are duly served to unsuspecting emo targets.


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Comments:

  1. If Microsoft or anyone else want me to have this on my computer without me blocking/defeating it then I’d like THEM to pay ME for every ad they stick up in front of me.

    Is it likely to happen, for me or anyone else? No.

    Is anyone likely to be happy that they’re being sold as the product without even getting a taste? No.

    Somehow, I don’t think this app’s going to fly…

  2. “Is anyone likely to be happy that they’re being sold as the product without even getting a taste?”

    As we can ee every day, yes, lots of people.
    If it’s done by a company, of course, if the government did it, it would be outrageous.

  3. Linux, Firefox, Ghostery, NoScript. And that will then be pushed to everyone i know.

  4. This has made my emotional state very hostile to uSoft (not an unusual state, given that I have Windows on several machines).

Windows 8 vs Idiocracy screen

Posted on June 13th, 2012 at 16:15 by John Sinteur in category: Microsoft

via


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Comments:

  1. The one is about as useful as the other

Raunchy dance routine a PR nightmare for Microsoft

Posted on June 11th, 2012 at 8:04 by John Sinteur in category: Apple, Microsoft

[Quote]:

A techno-dance routine that preceded Microsoft’s Windows Azure presentation at the Norwegian Developers Conference this week featured a group of women jumping around on stage to a song that included several drug references and this line: “The words MICRO and SOFT don’t apply to my penis.”

In a strange effort to be inclusive, a monitor displaying the lyrics added, “or vagina.”

As Gruber says, “Now Apple has to redo their whole plan for tomorrow’s WWDC keynote”

[Quote]:

Microsoft has apologised for a performance at its Norwegian developers conference that it now says “involved inappropriate and offensive elements and vulgar language”.


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Comments:

  1. Take that theonion!

An unauthorized certificate could be used to spoof content, perform phishing attacks, or perform man-in-the-middle attacks. This issue affects all supported releases of Microsoft Windows.

Posted on June 9th, 2012 at 10:05 by John Sinteur in category: Microsoft, Security

[Quote]:

“Flame” is the name of a newly-identified malware program which utilizes a previously unknown MD5 collision attack to successfully spoof Microsoft Terminal Services, and install itself as a trusted program using Windows Update, Microsoft has confirmed. The program appears to have targeted computers in the Middle East, and specifically Iran; analysts have alleged it is likely created by the same entity that designed Stuxnet. Flame has been live and actively spying since 2010, but went undetected until recently, due to sophisticated anti-detection measures.
While anonymous US officials have claimed responsibility for the program, officially both the USA and Israel have denied any involvement.

[Quote]:

Summary and conclusions:

  • The Flame command-and-control infrastructure, which had been operating for years, went offline immediately after our disclosure of the malware’s existence last week.
  • We identified about 80 total domains which appear to belong to the Flame C&C infrastructure.
  • The Flame C&C domains were registered with an impressive list of fake identities and with a variety of registrars, going back as far as 2008.
  • The attackers seem to have a high interest in PDF documents, Office and AutoCad drawings.
  • The data uploaded to the C&C is encrypted using relatively simple algorithms. Stolen documents are compressed using open source Zlib and modified PPDM compression.
  • Flame is using SSH connections (in addition to SSL) to exfiltrate data. The SSH connection is established by a fully integrated Putty-based library.
  • Windows 7 64 bit, which we previously recommended as a good solution against infections with other malware, seems to be effective against Flame

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‘In Ad Network Nightmare, Microsoft Making “Do Not Track” Default for IE 10′

Posted on June 1st, 2012 at 22:59 by John Sinteur in category: Google, If you're in marketing, kill yourself, Microsoft

[Quote]:

So let me get this straight. Advertising networks that track user behavior are OK with “Do Not Track” only so long as a single-digit percentage of users have it turned on? But if a lot of people start using it they’re out? Not being able to track users across the web is a “nightmare” for ad networks?

Years ago I had the idea that if Microsoft really wanted to destroy Google, they should have released a version of IE with a built-in on-by-default ad-blocker that included Google ads in its blacklist.


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Microsoft to charge customers $99 to remove OEM ‘crapware’

Posted on May 18th, 2012 at 17:16 by John Sinteur in category: Microsoft

[Quote]:

Let’s follow the money. The OEMs are paid by a variety of software makers to install crapware onto systems. The OEMs don’t disclose how much money they receive from this, but sources tell me that it works out at a few dollars per PC. That doesn’t sound like much, but multiply that across millions of PCs and it becomes a significant number.

Then the customer pays the OEM — or a middleman — for the PC, a PC which Microsoft itself admits is “slower-than-should-be” because of all the stuff loaded onto the system unnecessarily. Consumers are expected to take their new PC to a Microsoft Store — though there are currently only 16 of them in the United States — and pay Microsoft $99 to remove the crapware that the OEMs were paid to install.

It could only be worse if the OEMs wanted payment to remove crapware. Think that wouldn’t happen? It’s already been tried. Back in 2008, Sony announced plans to charge customers $50 for what it called “Fresh Start” systems that were free of crapware. The plans were dropped following a barrage of negative feedback.

The OEMs make money from installing crapware onto PCs, and now Microsoft is making money removing it. Makes you realize why more and more people are buying Apple hardware.

Most of you probably already know that you can remove a lot of the preinstalled crapware from PCs using PC Decrapifier. It won’t give you the nice Signature edition desktop wallpaper, and won’t install pretty much every piece of Windows Live software ever made onto your PC — like Microsoft seems to do on Signature editions PCs — but it will remove most of the crapware that you find on new PCs. And the best part is it won’t cost you $99. In fact, it won’t cost you anything, because it’s free for personal use.


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Comments:

  1. I bought a computer from some lame company like HP a few years back. Took days to get rid of the crap. I’ll never get that time back. That’s when I realized that I was the product being sold (as usual).

  2. To be fair, it’s not Microsoft who puts the crapware on the PCs, it’s Sony, HP, Lenovo, whoever.
    So we now slam Microsoft for asking money for providing a service that removes crap from the laptops that Microsoft didn’t put there.

    Microsoft sells Windows. Sony puts on extra crap. Customer complains. Goes to Sony: please remove crap. Sony says: Go to Microsoft. Customer goes to Microsoft: please, remove crap installed by Sony. Microsoft says: Sure, but it is not my crap, it’s an extra work, so I will charge you for that.
    Customer: Microsoft is evil, he charges money to solve a problem someone else caused!!! Bwaaaaah!!

  3. Actually, the word ‘evil’ isn’t anywhere on this page. Let me restate the article for you again. It’s more like Sue says – company A makes money off you, company B makes money off you, company C makes money off you, and as a result company A has yet another way to make money off you. You are being taken for a sucker, and it isn’t necessary. Just realize why Company D is so successful selling stuff that isn’t full of crap in the first place, or if that doesn’t work for you, use free product X and you’ll cut out company A and C.

    There. No evil in sight. Feel better now?

The best smartphone

Posted on May 12th, 2012 at 18:30 by John Sinteur in category: Apple, Microsoft

Siri, on the iPhone, mostly uses Wolfram Alpha as a search engine. Since it has a fairly limited set of product reviews, you can get hilarious results like this:

When you ask the Nokia Lumia 800 what the best smartphone ever is – thus using Microsoft’s TellMe service in combination with Bing – the first result you will get is this Business Insider article with the following headline:


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Comments:

  1. They don’t lack humility. Inevitably they are now better than most humans.

Nokia on ‘brink of failure’, warns analyst

Posted on April 13th, 2012 at 1:00 by John Sinteur in category: Microsoft

[Quote]:

Fogg may have underestimated the developer issue. What most Nokia-watchers appear to be unaware of is that for developers, breakage lies ahead. The three bedrock components of Windows Phone 7x – the Embedded CE kernel, the Compact .NET framework and Silverlight – are all being cast aside. Windows 8 Apollo will share the same kernel as Windows 8. What third-party developers are supposed to do is not clear. Will all today’s applications break? Will there be a legacy runtime? What source-conversion tools will be available? Even key Nokia sources don’t know the answer to these questions yet.

I’ve got a Lumia 800 to develop on, and it’s a nice phone. But I haven’t been able to make a business case for an app on it, yet, and I worry I never will.


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Comments:

  1. When they’ve been desperately paying bounties to developers for putting out WP7 apps do you think they’d carelessly throw away that investment? Seems quite unlikely. Remember how apps came along from DOS to Win95 to WinNT/XP? Yeah.

    This drivel is coming from “one analyst”. Analysts are those guys who couldn’t get a gig as a well-paid consultant and had to find something else, right?

Microsoft apologizes over ‘Smoked by Windows Phone’ controversy, offers winner laptop and phone

Posted on March 26th, 2012 at 20:37 by John Sinteur in category: If you're in marketing, kill yourself, Microsoft

[Quote]:

Microsoft’s working quickly to counter backlash it’s receiving after denying a user who won a Windows Phone challenge his just reward. Yesterday, Sahas Katta won a “Smoked by Windows Phone” challenge when his Galaxy Nexus displayed the weather of two different cities faster than the Windows Phone he was up against, but the Microsoft store claimed that he had to show weather from two different states. Microsoft has been roundly bashed for this technicality since then, so Windows Phone evangelist Ben Rudolph has just taken to Twitter to apologize and offer Katta a new laptop and Windows Phone, as well as an apology.

You could see this coming miles away. I mean, what marketing genius thought it was a great idea to set up a rigged “contest” where the whole point is to ridicule your potential customers one at a time? How is this supposed to make your potential customers feel good? And why do you thing that, in the age of the Internet, you can get away with cheating potential customers?


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