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Naked cyclists, neo-Nazis and anti-fascists to meet in Bristol at same time and place on Saturday

Posted on June 3rd, 2016 at 17:40 by John Sinteur in category: News

[Quote:]

A possible confrontation between far-right protestors on a march against refugees and a counter-demonstration opposing them in Bristol on Saturday could be interrupted by hundreds of naked cyclists.

Organisers of the Bristol World Naked Bike Ride event have released their route and timings – and they will be pedalling through College Green at roughly the same time as the two demonstrations come together.

And if the situation needed any more absurdity, just a couple of hundred yards away, UKIP leader Nigel Farage will also be speaking at a political rally.


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Comments:

  1. See you there! I’ll be on a bike.

  2. Say “Cheese”.

  3. Naked cyclists? They’ll need baggywrinkle 🙂

Facebook says its new AI can understand text with ‘near-human accuracy’

Posted on June 3rd, 2016 at 16:48 by John Sinteur in category: News

[Quote:]

Facebook is using its latest AI project to get a lot smarter at understanding text. In fact, the social network says DeepText, its new “text understanding engine,” is so good, it can interpret “several thousands posts a second” with “near-human accuracy.”

[..]

On Messenger, for example, it’s being used for something Facebook calls “intent extraction” — figuring out the difference between messages that may sound similar but have very different meanings. Writing “I need a ride,” for instance, may trigger a prompt for you to call an Uber but writing “I found a ride,” shouldn’t.

DeepText could also be used to proactively steer users toward Facebook tools based on the content of their updates. As Facebook’s researchers explain:

For example, someone could write a post that says, “I would like to sell my old bike for $200, anyone interested?” DeepText would be able to detect that the post is about selling something, extract the meaningful information such as the object being sold and its price, and prompt the seller to use existing tools that make these transactions easier through Facebook.

It is trivial to understand thousands of posts per second in multiple languages with their new framework, but they decline to use them to prevent online harassment and rape threats. Bike sales seem like a better target.

We see you’ve bought flowers, chocolate and wine. Would you like to see our selection of condoms? If not, we have a special on diapers in about nine months.


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  1. In Indiana: We see you bought flowers, chocolate and wine. Would you like to read a piece on Abstinence? If not, how about a peace about the dangers of contraception. (If in Turkey, …chocolate and wine…now go breed and do not even think about using contraceptives). //What a f’d up world, barbarians on all sides.

I live in the Central African bush. We pay for slow satellite internet (per MB d/l). Just ONE of our computers has secretly d/l’ed 6GB for Windows 10. We track & coordinate anti-poaching rangers in the field with these PC’s + GPS. F* You Microsoft!

Posted on June 3rd, 2016 at 16:42 by John Sinteur in category: News

[Quote:]

Self Explanatory. Aside from the fact that we pay per MB, and already share a slow connection, if a forced upgrade happened and crashed our pc’s while in the middle of coordinating rangers under fire from armed militarized poachers.. blood could literally be on MS’s hands. I just came here recently to act as their pilot.. but have IT skills as well. The guy who set these pc’s up didn’t know how to prevent it, or set a metered connection. I am completely livid.


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Comments:

  1. Why one should not run Windows on field PC’s. Not only is it unreliable, it is expensive in so many ways, as this post shows. Run Linux on your systems. You’ll be glad you did!

  2. I’ll be taking your advice Spaceman 🙂

    I just got bushwacked by this as well (on an old laptop). It looks like they changed the close button on the “Do you want to upgrade to Win10” button, to accept the d/l. I wondered why it was appearing so often, perhaps 10 times a day in the last week…and then I left it open for half an hour…

    Obviously my problem (having my computer disabled for a half day) is nothing compared to these guys, but I feel very, very annoyed. Very.

Lightning Storm Recorded at 7000 Frames Per Second

Posted on June 1st, 2016 at 20:45 by John Sinteur in category: News


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Comments:

  1. Interesting how once the leading bolts hit the ground, the reverse charge goes up almost instantaneously – near speed of light I suspect. That’s because the “channel” or “cable” is then available to carry the charge (ionized air molecules). Wham! And when lighting strikes, it is that reverse bolt that will kill you since it has MUCH more current capacity than the down bolts. At least that’s how I understand it from my freshman physics classes.

And they wonder why we install adblockers

Posted on June 1st, 2016 at 20:33 by John Sinteur in category: News

[Quote:]

We are very excited to bring our mobile marketing capabilities to the pro-life community,” Flynn told Live Action News.


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  1. I miss the tag, “If you’re in marketing, kill yourself!”

Why can’t girls code?

Posted on May 31st, 2016 at 18:01 by John Sinteur in category: News


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  1. Titter 🙂

Identifying People from their Driving Patterns

Posted on May 30th, 2016 at 18:10 by John Sinteur in category: News

[Quote:]

…a group of researchers from the University of Washington and the University of California at San Diego found that they could “fingerprint” drivers based only on data they collected from internal computer network of the vehicle their test subjects were driving, what’s known as a car’s CAN bus. In fact, they found that the data collected from a car’s brake pedal alone could let them correctly distinguish the correct driver out of 15 individuals about nine times out of ten, after just 15 minutes of driving. With 90 minutes driving data or monitoring more car components, they could pick out the correct driver fully 100 percent of the time.


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  1. Blimey. We’ll have to submit our driving patterns to get a price on insurance…

Lest we forget!

Posted on May 30th, 2016 at 18:04 by John Sinteur in category: News

gg7UYgRfMo09IC7gvO4F-wF_-Z3pkp3BmfsZp1X48Tk

 

 

This isn’t Veterans Day, it’s Memorial Day! This is a day to specifically honor those that DIED serving breakfast! Some came out of breakfast alive, but others are toast.


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Google’s upcoming Allo messaging app is ‘dangerous’, Edward Snowden claims

Posted on May 30th, 2016 at 9:23 by John Sinteur in category: News

[Quote:]

Using Google’s upcoming messaging app is “dangerous”, according to Edward Snowden.

In a tweet, the whistleblower advised against using Allo, the search giant’s latest app, saying: “Google’s decision to disable end-to-end encryption by default in its new Allo chat app is dangerous, and makes it unsafe. Avoid it for now.

No surprise – Google makes its money by knowing everything about you, up to the color of your socks and how often you fart. Having end-to-end-encryption is detrimental to that.


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Comments:

  1. Red socks on the port, green on starboard?

  2. Yep. And I’ve got another pair just like them at home.

Connected Car Security

Posted on May 29th, 2016 at 12:16 by John Sinteur in category: News

[Quote:]

Connecting cars to the Internet and cloud-based services has clear benefits for both drivers and passengers with features ranging from navigation systems with live search functions to streaming audio options. But along with connectivity comes a certain level of risk—cybersecurity concerns recently exposed in hacks of a Jeep SUV and the Nissan Leaf EV (electric vehicle).

Now, experts say, the same connectivity may also offer a solution to this cybersecurity problem, in the form of over-the-air updates.

Think of Windows update fun brought to cars…


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Comments:

  1. Oh, there used to be that joke about if Windows were a car…

    Not so funny now, huh?

  2. So, what happens when your Windows controlled car gets a “blue screen”? It would give new meaning to that old term “blue screen of death”, wouldn’t it? :rolleyes:

  3. @Sue – I think #10 is how my wife’s Prius works today! 🙂

  4. Ok. Maybe it just says “Power” – not sure. I don’t drive it much. It is the big round button on the dash.

  5. @Spaceman: Oh well…when you read stories written about 80 years ago (Grapes of Wrath for ex.) they talk about “raising the spark” and using a starting handle…and I think trucks were driven standing up…

    We’re the anachonistic ones now 🙂

By the Numbers: Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump are Fringe Candidates

Posted on May 28th, 2016 at 18:06 by John Sinteur in category: News

[Quote:]

To those who have tried to relate theory to practice, capitalist democracy is neither capitalist nor democratic. Ironically, in the modern era it was Bill Clinton who used this paradox to (his own) best affect by joining politics with economics through ‘micro’ choice in the context of a fixed system of political economy. People are given a choice between capitalist products— Bank of America or Wells Fargo, Coke or Pepsi, and a choice between political products— Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump; Democrats or Republicans. This strategy serves to define the realm of choice in terms beneficial to the providers of these products as well as to give ‘democratic’ credence through the fact of choice, no matter how implausible it may be.

Lesser-evilism is the ‘negative’ choice that leaves this realm of choice intact. In recent polls a majority of both Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump supporters gave stopping the other candidate as their main reason for supporting their chosen candidate. The problem for  ‘consumer choice’ theories of electoral politics is that ‘consumers’ don’t buy Pepsi to limit Coke consumption— all choices are ‘positive’ in the sense that they are ‘for’ one product or another. When negative votes (votes against one candidate or the other) are added to voters who are registered Independents and eligible non-voters, rejection of the broad system of electoral politics is over 90%. Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump and their alleged majoritarian views are about as popular as dog feces and pedophilia when the votes, broadly considered, are counted.

What is gained politically from / for this system of electoral politics is the façade of popular consent without the burden of actually getting and keeping it.


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Everything is a Remix: The Force Awakens

Posted on May 27th, 2016 at 23:43 by John Sinteur in category: News


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Secret Text in Senate Bill Would Give FBI Warrantless Access to Email Records

Posted on May 27th, 2016 at 16:47 by John Sinteur in category: News

[Quote:]

A provision snuck into the still-secret text of the Senate’s annual intelligence authorization would give the FBI the ability to demand individuals’ email data and possibly web-surfing history from their service providers without a warrant and in complete secrecy.

If passed, the change would expand the reach of the FBI’s already highly controversial national security letters. The FBI is currently allowed to get certain types of information with NSLs — most commonly, information about the name, address, and call data associated with a phone number or details about a bank account.

Since a 2008 Justice Department legal opinion, the FBI has not been allowed to use NSLs to demand “electronic communication transactional records,” such as email subject lines and other metadata, or URLs visited.

The spy bill passed the Senate Intelligence Committee on Tuesday, with the provision in it. The lone no vote came from Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., who wrote in a statement that one of the bill’s provisions “would allow any FBI field office to demand email records without a court order, a major expansion of federal surveillance powers.”

Wyden did not disclose exactly what the provision would allow, but his spokesperson suggested it might go beyond email records to things like web-surfing histories and other information about online behavior. “Senator Wyden is concerned it could be read that way,” Keith Chu said.


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Revealed: report for Unesco on the Great Barrier Reef that Australia didn’t want world to see

Posted on May 27th, 2016 at 10:55 by John Sinteur in category: News

[Quote:]

This description of the Great Barrier Reef, obtained by Guardian Australia, was written by experts for a Unesco report on tourism and climate change but removed after objections from the Australian government. This draft would have been subject to minor amendments after being peer-reviewed. The lead author, Adam Markham, is deputy director of climate and energy at the Union of Concerned Scientists.


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Dropbox Wants More Access to Your Computer, and People Are Freaking Out

Posted on May 27th, 2016 at 10:16 by John Sinteur in category: News

[Quote:]

On Tuesday, Dropbox published more details about upcoming changes to the company’s desktop client that will allow users to access all of the content in their account as if it is stored on their own machine, no matter how small the hard-disk on their computer.

In other words, you can browse through your own file system and have direct access to your cloud storage, without having to go and open a web browser nor worry about filling up your hard-drive.

Sounds great, but experts and critics have quickly pointed out that Dropbox Infinite, as the technology is called, may open up your computer to more serious vulnerabilities, because it works in a particularly sensitive part of the operating system.

Reminder: former US Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice joined DropBox’s board of directors.


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Hussam and The Death Way

Posted on May 27th, 2016 at 9:20 by John Sinteur in category: News

[Quote:]


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  1. What a fucked up world we live in.

Google beats Oracle—Android makes “fair use” of Java APIs

Posted on May 26th, 2016 at 23:25 by John Sinteur in category: News

[Quote:]

Following a two-week trial, a federal jury concluded Thursday that Google’s Android operating system does not infringe Oracle-owned copyrights because its re-implementation of 37 Java APIs is protected by “fair use.” The verdict was reached after three days of deliberations.


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US nuke arsenal runs on 1970s IBM ‘puter waving 8-inch floppies

Posted on May 26th, 2016 at 11:17 by John Sinteur in category: News

[Quote:]

Coordinates the operational functions of the United States’ nuclear forces, such as intercontinental ballistic missiles, nuclear bombers, and tanker support aircrafts. This system runs on an IBM Series/1 computer — a 1970s computing system — and uses 8-inch floppy disks.

 

Excellent news. That way they’re not part of the IoT, the Internet of Targets.


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What’s driving Silicon Valley to become ‘radicalized’

Posted on May 25th, 2016 at 7:43 by John Sinteur in category: News

[Quote:]

Like many Silicon Valley start-ups, Larry Gadea’s company collects heaps of sensitive data from his customers.

Recently, he decided to do something with that data trove that was long considered unthinkable: He is getting rid of it.

The reason? Gadea fears that one day the FBI might do to him what it did to Apple in their recent legal battle: demand that he give the agency access to his encrypted data. Rather than make what he considers a Faustian bargain, he’s building a system that he hopes will avoid the situation entirely.


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Google plans to bring password-free logins to Android apps by year-end

Posted on May 24th, 2016 at 23:49 by John Sinteur in category: News

[Quote:]

Google’s plan to eliminate passwords in favor of systems that take into account a combination of signals – like your typing patterns, your walking patterns, your current location, and more – will be available to Android developers by year-end, assuming all goes well in testing this year. In an under-the-radar announcement Friday afternoon at the Google I/O developer conference, the head of Google’s research unit ATAP (Advanced Technology and Projects) Daniel Kaufman offered a brief update regarding the status of Project Abacus, the name for a system that opts for biometrics over two-factor authentication.

Really. So from now on, you’ll have to trust Google to allow you into your bank account. Or not. Well…. Dear Google… The relationship which I might tentatively venture to aver has been not without some degree of reciprocal utility and perhaps even occasional gratification, is emerging a point of irreversible bifurcation and, to be brief, is in the propinquity of its ultimate regrettable termination.

I’ve arrived at the point where I feel I need more protection FROM Google than I need protection BY Google.


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  1. Freedom from Google. yes!

R.I.P., GOP: How Trump Is Killing the Republican Party

Posted on May 23rd, 2016 at 21:57 by John Sinteur in category: News

[Quote:]

There was a time in this country – and many voters in places like Indiana and Michigan and Pennsylvania are old enough to remember it – when business leaders felt a patriotic responsibility to protect American jobs and communities. Mitt Romney’s father, George, was such a leader, deeply concerned about the city of Detroit, where he built AMC cars.

But his son Mitt wasn’t. That sense of noblesse oblige disappeared somewhere during the past generation, when the newly global employer class cut regular working stiffs loose, forcing them to compete with billions of foreigners without rights or political power who would eat toxic waste for five cents a day.


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  1. “Then they hired politicians and intellectuals to sell the peasants in places like America on why this was the natural order of things. Unfortunately, the only people fit for this kind of work were mean, traitorous scum, the kind of people who in the military are always eventually bayoneted by their own troops. This is what happened to the Republicans, and even though the cost was a potential Trump presidency, man, was it something to watch.”

  2. I feel sick whenever politicians say American workers need more training to compete with farmers in China. I guess we need to learn how to survive on rice and grubs.

Mad Max: Fury Road vs Mad Max Trilogy

Posted on May 23rd, 2016 at 13:49 by John Sinteur in category: News


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  1. I suppose I should be embarassed to admit it but they could make 10 of them that similar and I’d enjoy every minute of every one of them…

EU’s top court: APIs can’t be copyrighted, would “monopolise ideas”

Posted on May 23rd, 2016 at 12:11 by John Sinteur in category: News

[Quote:]

The European Court of Justice ruled on Wednesday that application programming interfaces (APIs) and other functional characteristics of computer software are not eligible for copyright protection. Users have the right to examine computer software in order to clone its functionality—and vendors cannot override these user rights with a license agreement, the court said.

The case focuses on the popular statistical package SAS. A firm called World Programming created a clone designed to run SAS scripts without modification. In order to do this, they bought a copy of SAS and studied its manual and the operation of the software itself. They reportedly did not have access to the source code, nor did they de-compile the software’s object code.

SAS sued, arguing that its copyright covered the design of the SAS scripting language, and that World Programming had violated the SAS licensing agreement in the process of cloning the software.

The EU’s highest court rejected these arguments. Computer code itself can be copyrighted, but functional characteristics—such as data formats and function names—cannot be. “To accept that the functionality of a computer program can be protected by copyright would amount to making it possible to monopolise ideas, to the detriment of technological progress and industrial development,” the court stated.

Perhaps we should get the EU Court to look at the Oracle vs Google case…


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How the Pentagon punished NSA whistleblowers

Posted on May 23rd, 2016 at 11:51 by John Sinteur in category: News

[Quote:]

By now, almost everyone knows what Edward Snowden did. He leaked top-secret documents revealing that the National Security Agency was spying on hundreds of millions of people across the world, collecting the phone calls and emails of virtually everyone on Earth who used a mobile phone or the internet. When this newspaper began publishing the NSA documents in June 2013, it ignited a fierce political debate that continues to this day – about government surveillance, but also about the morality, legality and civic value of whistleblowing.

But if you want to know why Snowden did it, and the way he did it, you have to know the stories of two other men.

The first is Thomas Drake, who blew the whistle on the very same NSA activities 10 years before Snowden did. Drake was a much higher-ranking NSA official than Snowden, and he obeyed US whistleblower laws, raising his concerns through official channels. And he got crushed.

Drake was fired, arrested at dawn by gun-wielding FBI agents, stripped of his security clearance, charged with crimes that could have sent him to prison for the rest of his life, and all but ruined financially and professionally. The only job he could find afterwards was working in an Apple store in suburban Washington, where he remains today. Adding insult to injury, his warnings about the dangers of the NSA’s surveillance programme were largely ignored.

“The government spent many years trying to break me, and the more I resisted, the nastier they got,” Drake told me.

Drake’s story has since been told – and in fact, it had a profound impact on Snowden, who told an interviewer in 2015 that: “It’s fair to say that if there hadn’t been a Thomas Drake, there wouldn’t have been an Edward Snowden.”

But there is another man whose story has never been told before, who is speaking out publicly for the first time here. His name is John Crane, and he was a senior official in the Department of Defense who fought to provide fair treatment for whistleblowers such as Thomas Drake – until Crane himself was forced out of his job and became a whistleblower as well.

His testimony reveals a crucial new chapter in the Snowden story – and Crane’s failed battle to protect earlier whistleblowers should now make it very clear that Snowden had good reasons to go public with his revelations.


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Making History Sucks

Posted on May 23rd, 2016 at 11:49 by John Sinteur in category: News

[Quote:]

I won a big FOIA victory, and all I got was this stupid police state.


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Uber knows when your phone is about to run out of battery

Posted on May 23rd, 2016 at 9:22 by John Sinteur in category: News

[Quote:]

Uber knows when the battery on your phone is running low – and that you are more likely to pay higher “surge” prices for a car as a result.

The taxi-hailing app captures a huge amount of data on all its users, and the company’s head of economic research Keith Chen has revealed how Uber uses that to inform its business strategy.

Speaking to NPR’s Hidden Brain programme, Mr Chen said the amount of battery users had left was “one of the strongest predictors of whether or not you are going to be sensitive to surge” – in other words, agree to pay 1.5 times, 2 times or more the normal cost of a journey.


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What kind of person is dumb enough to become a Scientologist?

Posted on May 21st, 2016 at 18:22 by John Sinteur in category: News

[Quote:]

Naturally his audience would laugh nervously at all of his speedfreak “jokes”, because if they didn’t chuckle at the Master’s unfunny remarks it meant that they weren’t “in” on something. You see how this sort of anxious dipshit groupthink might work? They were all so invested in not looking like fools that they became the biggest fools of all.


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Fox ‘Stole’ a Game Clip, Used it in Family Guy & DMCA’d the Original

Posted on May 21st, 2016 at 13:50 by John Sinteur in category: News

[Quote:]

Just when you think you’ve seen every ridiculous example of a bogus DMCA-style takedown, another steps up to take the crown. This week’s abomination comes courtesy of Fox and it’s an absolute disaster.

 


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Feel Me

Posted on May 19th, 2016 at 17:00 by John Sinteur in category: News

 

[Quote:]

Only recently has brain science fully grasped that skin and touch are as rich and paradoxical as any other part of our humanity. Touch is the unsung sense -the one that we depend on most and talk about least. We know the illusions that our eyes or ears can create. But our skin is capable of the same high ordering and the same deceptions. It is as though we lived within a five- or six-foot-tall eye, an immense, enclosing ear, with all an eye or ear’s illusions, blind spots, and habitual mistakes. We are so used to living within our skins that we allow them to introduce themselves as neutral envelopes, capable of excitation at the extremities (and at extreme moments), rather than as busy, body-sensing organs. We see our skins as hides hung around our inner life, when, in so many ways, they are the inner life, pushed outside.


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Politician claims porn tabs a malware experiment, then finds God

Posted on May 18th, 2016 at 23:25 by John Sinteur in category: News

[Quote:]

The Republican, who is vying for Virginia’s 8th district, posted a screenshot of his computer to his Facebook page about a call he had received from a staffing agency, but failed to check what other browser tabs he had open.


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  1. Democrats = dick pics. Republicans = porn.

    Conclusion? Democrats are better endowed.


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